Buildings Edit

Summary

Level of Description
Collection
Language
English

Dates

  • 1809 – 2010 (Creation)

Extents

  • 5 Items (Whole)

Subjects

Notes

  • Abstract

    Reference; Buildings; "Miami University Buildings: Past and Present," by Peter Flintermann; 1966 [1A-F-1A]

    Reference; Buildings; Miami Album, by Walter Havighurst, John Watterson Howard, and Joyce Gordon; 1981

    Reference; Buildings; "Biographies of the Men and Women for Whom the Buildings of Miami University Have Been Named," by R. E. Glos; 1809-1983

    Includes Classification of Names; List of Buildings Named for Persons; Trees with Nameplates in the McGuffey "CourtYard"; Named Areas, Location, and Means of Identification; Buildings Razed, Sold, or Moved When No Longer Used by Miami Unversity, 1809-1983; Fraternity and Sorority Gifts to Miami University.

    Preface

    In 1948 the Administrative Council appointed a sub-committee on Names for University Buildings. Members were Bertha M. Emerson, C. W. Kreger, W. F. Cottrell, and R. E. Glos, Chairman. A second committee was appointed in 1951 consisting of Belva Lind, Helen Page, C. W. Kreger, H. C. Brill, and R. E. Glos, Chairman. In 1967 the Board of Trustees established a Committee on Naming of Buildings. Members were Edward Nippert and William Anderson as alumni representatives, Walter Havighurst and R. E. Glos representing the faculty, with Mrs. Lucile Cooks from the Board of Trustees as Chairman. President Shriver served as an ex-officio member and, beginning in 1969, Mrs. John Dolibois, Vice President for Development and Alumni Affairs, met regularly with the Committee. In 1973 the composition of the Committee was changed as Nessrs. Nippert and Anderson were unable to attend meetings. New members were Ralph N. Fey, Karl E. Limper, and Gordon D. Wilson. This historical background is given to explain my long-standing interest in the names attached to buildings of Miami University. Previously others have had a similar interest and have prepared reports. Probably the oldest is a mimeographed list of buildings possibly for use by visitors to the campus. It has all the earmarks of a document prepared by Miss Marie Marshall and appears to have been dated between 1933 and 1936. Only a brief statement is made about each building and the person for whom it is named is merely identified. In later years a mimeographed list of buildings was titled "Tour" and its numbers doubtless correspond with the members used to identify the buildings on a University map. Again, identification of the individuals concerned was very brief. In 1963, judging from buildings named, an unknown author provided a manuscript titled "The Historical Facts of Miami's Building Names." This was followed in 1965 by an excellent report headed "Miami Buildings, Past and Present - Being a Summary of Some Names and Dates Associated with Them." This was the work of Peter Flintermann, Reference Librarian. In 1968 Mrs. Kay Irwin, Secretary to the President, prepared a manuscript titled "Miami University Facilities." By far the most complete of all studies of University buildings, a considerable number of facets are given about each structure as date of construction, cost, use, square and cubic footage, and sources of funds. In addition, attention is given to the individual for whom the building was named. Mrs. Irwin's manuscript listed her sources of information as follows: Miami University Alumni Catalogue, Centennial Edition, 1809-1909; Alumni Directory, 1826-1873, 1888-1940; Annual Reports of the President (1898-1964); Catalogue of the University; The History of Oxford College for Women by Olive Flower; Men of Old Miami by John D. Millett; The Miami Years by Walter Havighurst; Minutes of the Board of Trustees; Old Miami by Alfred H. Upham; Old Oxford Houses by Ophia D. Smith; and Recensios. All of these sources as well as many others have been used to compile the biographies attached. The Miami University Bulletin - Alumni News Letters and the volumes of Who Was Who in America have been extremely helpful. The Dictionary of American Biography, and the National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, County historical volumes, and obituaries printed in the Oxford Press sometimes provided information. The card file of former faculty members that had been maintained by Miss Marie Marshall proved invaluable in specific instances as did the news releases provided by Mr. Robert Howard of the News Bureau. In view of the several studies already made it might well be asked why another one has been prepared. The answer is that each one mentioned divided attention between the building itself and the man or woman for whom it was named. This resulted, in numerous instances, in a failure to provide adequate coverage of the life of the individual concerned. Although the following biographies do mention the buildings, emphasis has been given to such details as dates of birth and death, education, and career details of the person for whom buildings have been named.

    Anderson Hall

    William C. Anderson 1804-1870

    William C. Anderson was the fourth President of the University, 1849-1854. As a Presbyterian minister since 1827, he had held a number of pastorates, coming to Miami from Dayton. His administration was marked by his warm friendliness and understanding of students (he introduced cricket, fencing, boxing and wrestling), and by his practically in managing the University's meager finances, in which he was assisted by his son John, of the class of 1853, who also became a minister and a university president (of the present Kansas State University, Manhattan, 1873-78). The above information was taken from the program for the dedication of the buildings facing the South Quadrangle of the South Campus of Miami University on September 16, 1961. A more detailed vita is found in the Centennial Edition of the Miami University Catalogue, which reads as follows: A. B., Washington Coll., 1824. A. M., Miami Univ., 1834. D. D., Miami Univ., 1846. Licensed by Presbytery of Washington, Pa., Dec. 13, 1827. Missionary in North Carolina, 1828-29. Agent, Presb. Board 1829-31. Pastor Presb. Church, Pigeon Creek, Pa., 1831-36. General Agent of the Western Foreign Missionary Board, 1836-37. Pastor Presb. churches, Pittsburgh, 1837-39; New Albany, Ind., 1839-43. Prof. Rhetoric, Hanover Coll., 1843-44. Pastor Fort Wayne, Inc., and Washington, Pa., 1844-45. Pastor Dayton, O., 1845-49. President Miami Univ., 1849-54. Pastor Chillicothe, O., 1854-55. Pastor San Francisco, 1855-63; Pastor Cincinnati, 1863-64; New Albany, Ind., 1864-65. Supply at Abilene and Manhattan, Ken., 1866-70. Porn, Washington Co., Pa. Aug. 18, 1804. Died Aug. 28, 1870. Father of Rev. John A. Anderson, class of '53.

    Another reference contains the following information: "Before William Anderson became Miami's President, the University was in a slump with only 68 students - an all time low. Within his administration enrollment reached 266." "Brilliant, popular, and prosperous" were terms used to describe his five years in the presidency. The present residence hall is the second one to hear the name Anderson Hall, which had been built in 1919 as a temporary structure, was renamed Anderson Hall in 1948. This building was demolished in 1961 to make room for Warfield Hall.

    Benton Hall

    Guy Potter Benton 1865-1927

    Benton Hall is named for Guy Potter Benton, twelfth president of the University, 1902-1911. The year he became president the total student enrollment was 124. There were but five buildings on the campus and the total student enrollment was 124. When he resigned nine years later to become president of the University of Vermont, the student enrollment had increased to more than 1,200. The income had advanced to approximately a quarter of a million dollars, and seven modern buildings had been erected in response to a constantly growing University constituency. His vita as published in the First Edition of Who Was Who in America reads as follows: Penton, Guy Potter, univ. pres.; b. Kenton, O., May 26, 1865. s. Daniel Webster and Harriet (Wharton) B.; A. B. Naker U.; A. M. Ohio Wesleyan; also studied U. of Wooster and in Berlin; D. D. Baker, 1900, Ohio Wesleyan U. 1905; LL. D. Upper Iowa U., 1906, U. of Vt., 1911, Middlebury Coll., 1912, U. of Mass., 1914; Miami U., 1916; L. H. D., Norwich U., 1916; m. Dollar Konantz, Sept. 4, 1889; children - Mrs. Helen Minnch, Paulin. Supt. of schools, Ft. Scott Kan., 1890-95; asst. state supt. pub. instrn., Kan., 1895-96; prof. history and sociology, Baker U., 1896-99; pres. Upper Iowa U., 1899-1902, Miami U., 1902-1911; pres. U. of Vt., 1911-1919; chief edul. consultant, pres. U. of Phillipines, 1921-24; retired. With A. E. F. 1917-19; gen. sec. Y. M. C. A. for City of Paris, Sept., Oct., and Nov., 1917; chief, organizing sec. for Y. M. C. A. with membership on staff of Brig. Gen. Sample, comdr. in chief of advance sect., A. E. F., Nov. 1917-June 1919; chief sec. 8th region, A. E. F. 1919; mem. U. S. Army Edul. Corps and chief edul. dir. Am. Army of Occupation with hdqrs. at Coblenz, Germany, to June 30, 1919; hon. disch. from U. S. A., July 24, 1919. Awarded D. S. M. by President of U. S. for war service Apr. 1920. Author: The Real College, 1909. Home: Minneapolis, Minn. Died June 28, 1927. The Centennial Edition of the Miami University Catalog, published while Dr. Benton was president, included additional information, notably: Member of Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Kappa Alpha, American Geographical Society, and American Historical Society. President, Ohio College Ass'n. 1904, Ohio Conf. of College Deans and Presidents, 1906. Benton's name was originally attached to a building constructed in 1908 to house the administrative offices and an auditorium. In 1969 a building designed primarily for use by the Department of Psychology was given the name Benton Hall and the older structure renamed Hall Auditorium.

    Billings Hall

    John Shaw Billings 1839-1913

    In 1951, a sub-committee of the Adminstrative Council appointed to recommend names for buildings made the following report: "We believe that the natatorium might be appropriately named for one of our most distinguished alumni, John Shaw Billings '57. This would be logical in that Dr. Billings was a medical mad and the other buildings devoted to health activities and health promotion, namely, the Wade MacMillan Hospital and Withrow Court, were named for physicians. Furthermore, Dr. Billings was a military man for a great many years, and this provides an added reason in light of the source for funds used for this building." The natatorium had been built with funds paid to the university by the federal government in connection with its World War II Navy contracts. There are several biographies of Dr. Billings extant. The following appears in Who Was Who 1897-1942: BILLINGS, John Shaw, surgeon, librarian; b. Zwitzerland Co., Ind. Apr. 12, 1839; s. James and Abbie (Shaw) B; A. B., Miami U., 1857, A. M., 1860; N. D., Med. Coll. of Ohio, 1860; (LL.D., U. of Edinburgh, 1884, Harvard, 1886, Buda-Pesth, 1896, Yale, 1901, Johns Hopkins, 1902; M. D., Munich, 1889, Dublin, 1892; D. C. L., Oxford, 1889); m. Kate M. Stevens, Sept. 3, 1862. Demonstrator anatomy, Med. Coll. of Ohio, 1860-61; served in U. S. A., as asst. surgeon, Apr. 16, 1862; maj. surgeon, Dec. 2, 1876; lt. col. deputy surgeon gen., June 6, 1894; bvtd. capt., maj. and lt. col., Mar. 13, 1865, "for faithful and meritorius services during the war"; in hosp. service during Civil War; later med. insp. Army of the Potomac, in charge of library of surgeon-general's office until his appmt., Dec. 28, 1883, as curator Med. Mus. and Library; retired Oct. 1, 1895. In charge vital statistics 10th Census, vital and social statistics, 11th Census. Prof. hygiene, U. of Pa., 1891, and dir., 1893-96; dir. N. Y. Pub. Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden foundations, 1896--, chmn. db. Carnegie Instn., 1905--. Fellow Am. Acad. Arts and Sciences; pres. A. L. A., 1901-02. Author: Principles of Ventilation and Heating, 1886; Index Catalog of the Library of the Surgeon-General's Office U. S. A. (16 vols.), 1880-1894; National Medical Dictionary (2 vols.), 1889. Home: New York. Died March 11, 1913. In 1895 Dr. Billings delivered the commencement address at his Alma Mater.

    Bishop Hall

    Robert Hamilton Bishop 1777-1855

    The name of Robert Hamilton Bishop, first president of the University 1824-1841, was attached to Miami's second women's residence hall when it was constructed in 1911-12. Until 1923 portions of Bishop Hall were also used as a hospital, with the whole building used for this purpose during the influenza epidemic of 1918. The vita of Dr. Bishop, as published in the Centennial Edition of the Miami University Catalogue, reads as follows: A. B. Univ. of Edinburg 1798, D. D. Studied theology with Prof. Lawson at Selkirk, Scotland, 1798-1802. Licensed by Pres. of Perth, (A. Burg) Scotland, June 28, 1802. Sailed with Dr. J. M. Mason to America, Sept., 1802. Pastor of Associate Ref'd. Presb. churches at Ebenezer and New Providence, Ky., 1803-14. Prof. in Transylvania Univ., Lexington, Ky., 1803-24. Editor of "Evangelical Record and Western Review," 1811-13. Joined the Presb. church, Oct. 1819. Pastor of McCord church, Lexington, Ky., 1819-23. President and Prof. Logic and Moral Philosophy and History in Miami Univ., 1824-41. Inaugurated March 30, 1825. Continued as Prof. of History and Political Science in Miami, 1841-45. President Farmer's Coll., 1845-55. Re-organized Presb. church in Oxford and Pastor, 1825-31. Author of "A volume of Sermons," 1808; "Memoirs of David Rice", or "An Outline of the History of the Christian Church in the State of Kentucky," 1824; "Elements of Logic," 1833; "Sketches of the Philosophy of the Bible," 1833; "Elements of the Science of Government," 1839; "The Western Peacemaker," 1839 and numerous special sermons and addresses. Father of Rev. George B., '28, Prof. Robert H., Jr., '31, Prof. Ebenezer E., '33, and Rev. John N., '41. Born in the parish of Whittburn, Linlithgowshire, Scotland, July 26, 1711. Died, April 29th, 1855. Dr. Bishop, and his wife as well, were buried on the grounds of Farmer's College in Cincinnati. On June 20, 1959, when the burial site was to be excavated for the construction of a new high school, they were reburied in a grave near the formal gardens of Miami University.

    Boyd Hall

    William Waddell Boyd 1862 - 1944

    Shortly after the close of World War II the Board of Trustees, at the urging of President Philip E. Henderson, voted to build a science building to be located north of Alumnae Hall. Its library, which was furnished by citizens of Oxford, was named the Oxford Room, and one of the laboratory rooms has been designated as the Kresge Room. Dedicated in 1947 its name was changed to Boyd Hall in 1963 as a memorial to a former president who had well served Western College for seventeen years. Volume II of Who Was Who in America carries the following biography of Dr. Boyd: BOYD, William Waddell, college pres; b. Allegheny, Pa., Mar. 8, 1862; s. Joseph Reed and Martha J. (McGonagle) B.; student Muskingum Coll., New Concord, Ohio, 1 yr.; A. B., Marietta Coll., 1884, Ped. D., 1911; LL. D., Miami U., 1933; studied in Europe 9 summers; m. Mary A. Gates, Sept. 1, 1887; children - Randolph King (dec.), Marion Margaret (Mrs. Walter Havighurst). Teacher pub. schs., Cambridge, O., 1884-85; teacher Crawfis Inst., Lancaster, 1885-90; prin. high sch., Marietta, 190-91; supt. schs., Marietta, 1891-98, Painesville, 1893-1902; high sch. insp., Ohio State U., 1902-07; dean Coll. of Edn., same, 1907-14; Pres. Western Coll. for Women, Oxford, O., 1914-31, now emeritus. Mem. Ohio State Bd. Sch. Examiners, 1893-1903; trustee Ohio Sunday Sch. Assn., Marietta Coll.; coll. counsellor Ohio Dept. of Edn. Mem. N. E. A., Ohio State Teachers Assn., North Central Assn. Colls. and Secondary Schs., Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Sigma Phi. Pres. North Central Assn., 1925, Ohio Coll. Assn., 1923. Republican. Presbyterian; vice-moderator Gen. Assembly of Presbyn. Ch., 1920. Clubs: Cincinnati Business Men's; Cincinnati Schoolmasters' (Columbus). Author: The Government and Civil Institutions of Ohio, 1906. Trustee Western Reserve Acad., Hudson, O. Cruise travel lecturer. Home: 1170 E. Broad St., Columbus, O. Died Feb. 2, 1944. Although this biography merely mentions Dr. Boyd's tenure as the President of Western College his accomplishments were outstanding. During his administration Western College flourished. Its enrollment, physical plant, endowment, faculty composition, and national reputation reached new highs.

    Brandon Hall

    Edgar Ewing Brandon 1865-1957

    Brandon Hall is named for Dean Brandon whose thirty-two years of service to Miami University covered the years from 1898 to 1930. At his retirement the Editor of the Alumni News Letter wrote: "We know of no better tribute to Dr. Brandon than the University itself, and the thousands of alumni whom he influenced in scholarship, learning, and character. Mere words of appreciation and praise, even though dictated by the eloquence of a Webster, could not equal the monument which Dr. Brandon has done so much to raise. To all comes the regret that one so much a part of Miami cannot go on forever, that there must be an end to active service. For a third of a century Dr. Brandon has come in direct personal contact with a great majority of our living alumni. With each he has left something of his sterling character and his scholarship, perpetual forces carrying on for the man who loved Miami, and gave all the years of his active life to her. Who was Who in America, Vol. III, provides the following vita: Brandon, Edgar Ewing, educator; born York Springs, Pa., Aug. 9, 1865; s. John Calvin and Mary Braiding (Ewing) B.; A. B., U. of Mich., 188; A. M., U. of Mo., 1897; studied U. of Paris, 1893-94, and 1901-02, Docteur d'Universite, 1904; LL. D., Miami U., 1930; m. Charlotte Taylor, June 11, 1901; m. 2d., Grace Glasgow, Aug. 14, 1929. Latin master, Carthage, Mo., 1889-93, instr. in French, U. of Mich., 1895-96 and 1897-98, fellow in Romance langs., U. of Mo., 1896-97; prof, Romance langs., Miami U., Oxford, O., 1898-31, v. p. 1908-31, dean 1912-31, acting pres., 1909-10, 1927-28, now emeritus. Dir. Foyer du Soldat, France, 1918-1919. Spl. comr. Pan-Am Union to visit and report on instns. of higher learning in Latin America, 1911-12. Del. to 2nd Pan-Am. Scientific Congress, 1915. Member Modern Lang. Assn. of America, Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Tau (pres. 1920-23). Mason. Republican. Presbyterian. Author: Robert Estienne et le doctionnaire francaise au XVI Siecle, 1904; Latin American Universities, 1912; Precis d'histoire des Etas Unis, 1919 (Trans. English 1919); A Pilgrimage of Liberty, 1944; Lafayette, Guest of the National, Vol. I, 1950, Vol. II, 1954, III, 1957. Editor: La Tulipe Noire, 1899; Monte Cristo, 1900; Series Lessons for Beginners in French, 1920. Joint editor La Petite ville, 1925; Henri III et sa cour, 1926; Turgaret, 1927. Home 315 E. Church St., Oxford, Ohio. Died June 8, 1957; buried Oxford Cemetery. At the time Brandon (and McFarland) Halls were planned it was noted that they were dormitories rather than residence halls. In view of Dean Brandon's promotion of the fraternity system, his service to Phi Kappa Tau fraternity, and his purchase of land for building fraternity houses, the location and function of Brandon Hall are both uniquely appropriate. Clawson Hall

    Edith Clawson 1878-1944

    Shortly after the end of World War II the trustees of Western College began plans for a science building and an additional dormitory. The alumnae adopted the dormitory as their project, and contributed generously. The total was greatly increased by a gift received in the will of Edith Clawson, and the new dormitory was named for her. Miss Edith Clawson was born in Hamilton, Ohio on December 7, 1878. She was the daughter of Linus P. and Rosa (Hughes) Clawson. Mr. Clawson was a co-founder of the Black and Clawson Co. Miss Clawson received an A. B. degree from Western College in the class of 1900. A year later she did graduate work at the University of Chicago and received a second A. b. degree. She attended the University of Berlin in 1903-05. While pursuing additional graduate study at the University of Chicago 1905-07 she was a teacher in the high school department of the School of Education. She also traveled in Europe and the Orient. After 1908 she was active in Hamilton, Ohio serving as president of the Women's Club and as a member of other organizations including the First Methodist Church. In 1913 she was an active participant in flood relief work and was assistant to the treasurer of the American Red Cross. From 1917 to 1920 she was general secretary and acting treasurer of the Hamilton Chapter of the American Red Cross. She moved to Los Angeles, California in the early twenties where she became Chairman of the Mission Department of the Hollywood Congregational Church. Although now a California resident, she made annual visits to Oxford and Hamilton. In 1933 she had been elected by Western alumnae as their first representative on the Board of Trustees and in 1937 the Board made her a permanent member. Her death occurred in California on October 28, 1944 and, in accord with her wishes, she was cremated and her ashes returned to Hamilton for burial. In 1962 a substantial addition in the form of a dining room was added to the dormitory. Built largely with funds contributed by an alumna, Bess Mason Alexander, this portion of Edith Clawson Hall was named the Alexander Dining Room.

    Climer Hall

    Fred Watson Climer Irene White Climer 1895-

    In 1966 when the alumni center was under construction, Mr. and Mr. Fred W. Climer became joint donors of the cost of a nine-suite guest facility, which became an addition to the main building. This wing has provided overnight accomodations for hundreds of guests of Miami University since its completion in 1968. Both Mr. and Mrs. Climer were graduated from Miami in 1917 with Bachelor of Arts degrees. As undergraduate students they were exceptionally active. Fred Climer was a member of Delta Tau Delta social fraternity and served as editor of the Miami Student in both his junior and senior years. He was also in the band, orchestra, glee club, and chapel choir; was an officer in the Commercial Club and the Ohio College Press Association; won a student assistantship in economics, and was elected to Sigma Delta Chi, Tau Kappa Alpha, and Grail and Red Cowl. Despite these diverse demands on his time he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Irene White, who came to Miami from New Richmond, Ohio, was a member of Chi Omega and participated in the Liberal Arts Club, the Classical Club, class basketball and hockey teams, and was on the staff of the Miami Student. She served as president of the Pan-Hellenic Council and as vice president of the Women's Athletic Board. The Climers were married on January 23, 1920. They had one son, Dan W., who was killed in the Battle of the Bulge in World War II. Mr. Climer was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, November 9, 1895 but entered Miami from Winchester, Indiana. He joined the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. upon graduation, spent approximately a year in the World War I army including overseas duty in the 84th division as a second lieutenant, and returned to Akron in 1919 to move up rapidly in Goodyear. He became employment manager in 1921 and personnel manager in 1923. He was sent to Argentina in 1930 to supervise construction of a thousand-times-a-day plant; he continued as its general superintendent until 1934, when he returned to personnel work in Akron. He became director of world-wide Goodyear factory and sales personnel in 1938, assistant to the president in 1943, vice president in charge of industrial relations in 1947; the title later was changed to vice president for labor relations. While in Akron Mr. Climer was a trustee of the YMCA, Peoples Hospital, Summit County Tuberculosis Association, and various clubs; member of the executive committee of the YMCA and United Foundation, and 1952 Campaign manager for United Foundation. Goodyear loaned him to the War Production Board for two years of World War II. He was a director of the New Richmond National Bank, 1957-68. Mr. Climer was a member of Miami's Board of Trustees 1953-68. He served as treasurer of the board from 1956-59 and vice chairman 1959-62. Since retiring from Goodyear in 1956 he and Mrs. Climer have maintained homes in New Richmond, Ohio and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. His Alma Mater conferred the Doctor of Laws degree on him in 1973.

    Foster J. Cole Service Building

    Foster J. Cole 1901-1968

    In 1956 the General Assembly of the State of Ohio appropriated $400,000 for the construction of a Maintenance and Stores Building. The site chosen was east of Cook Field in an area used by the grounds department as a nursery. In 1969 a recommendation of the Committee on Naming Buildings that this one-story structure be designated the Foster J. Cole Maintenance Building was approved by the Board of Trustees. In 1973, in recognition of the expanded use of the area and its designation on the University map as the Foster J. Cole Service Building, it was recommended and approved that the latter name receive official sanction. Foster J. Cole was born in Wharton, in Wyandot County near Upper Sandusky, July 22, 1901. He spent his boyhood in Hamilton, where his father was a hardware merchant; was graduated from the old Hamilton High School in 1920, and received the Bachelor of Arts degree was Miami in 1924. Shortly after graduation he joined the business staff of Miami and served his Alma Mater continuously until his retirement in 1965. He held the title of purchasing agent or Director of Purchases for over 30 years and became business manager in 1954 when illness handicapped W. P. Roudebush, whose title was vice president and treasurer. In this capacity he was in charge of all construction, physical plant operation and maintenance, procurement, personnel and service operations, and auxiliary enterprises which included the residence hall system, airport, and University Center. In addition to 41 years of service to Miami University, Mr. Cole served a term as president of the National Association of Educational Buyers and as a member of the board of directors of the Educational and Institutional Cooperative Service. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the Oxford National Bank prior to its becoming a branch bank, and was a trustee of the Beta Theta Pi Foundation, which was set up to finance the Centenary and the construction of the Beta Theta Pi Campanile on the campus. In later years he devoted a great deal of time and effort to the men of the Honor Camp, which the State correctional system had established at Hueston Woods State Park. Mr. Cole was married on August 17, 1927 to Miss Elizabeth Nitchie, who had been an instructor in the Department of Women's Physical Education for two years. They were divorced many years later and there were no children. Mr. Cole died at his Oxford home on June 22, 1968 of an apparent heart attack.

    Collins Hall

    Joel Collins 1772-1860

    Collins Hall was first occupied in January, 1953 by freshmen who had been living in the Lodges, temporary men's housing located in the veteran's area. An addition to Collins Hall was completed in 1956. Joel Collins was born in Halifax County, Virginia, September 16, 1772. In 1779 his family moved to Kentucky and by the time Joel was 18 years old he was an Indian fighter having learned some of his lessons from Daniel Boone. From 1791 to 1797 he was a various times a sergeant, lieutenant, and captain in the Kentucky militia and United States army. He saw service at Fort Hamilton and Fort Greenville in Ohio. In 1797 he became a judge in Lincoln County, Kentucky. He married Elizabeth Peeler whose brother had settled on Four Mile Creek near Oxford. In 1806 the family moved to this area. He cleared land for farming, established a powder mill, and when the township was organized Collins was elected the first justice of the peace. He surveyed much of the land in and near Oxford. In 1809 he led a committee appointed to locate Miami University on "Education Hill" - its present location. Captain Collins - he was so appointed in the standing army of the United States - served Miami University in several capacities. He was superintendent of grounds and college buildings from 1815 to 1827 and was secretary of the board of trustees from 1822 to 1855. In 1817 he was elected to the General Assembly of the State of Ohio and in 1821 his vote prevented the removal of Miami University to Cincinnati. Subsequently he was able to prevent several other efforts to move the University out of Oxford. Collins has been called an Indian fighter, farmer, judge, statesmen, surveyor, and military man. In addition, there is no doubt but that he was a loyal supporter of Miami University. He died in Oxford on November 16, 1860.

    Cook Place

    R(obert) Harvey Cook 1870-1949

    Cook Place was built as a home for Dr. R. Harvey Cook who, with his father, operated a sanitarium. When the Oxford Retreat (Fisher Hall) was sold to Miami University in 1925 its patients were moved to the Pines, which was adjacent to Cook Place. In 1936 Miami University acquired the remaining Cook properties with the provision that Dr. and Mrs. Cook were to have use of the residence during their lifetimes. The biography of Dr. Cook as it appears in Who Was Who 1943-50 is as follows: COOK, R(obert) Harvey, physician; b. Eaton O., 1870; s. George Frederick and Sallie J. (Pryor) C.; A. B. Miami U., 1891, A. M., 1894; M. D. Med. Coll. of Ohio, 1894; post-grad. work in New York and abroad; m. Besse Orr, Dec. 18, 1895; children--George Harvey, M. O. Specializes in nervous diseases. Became Supt. of Oxford Retreat, a pvt. hosp., 1910, now retired. Mem. A. M. A., Am. Psychol. Assn., Ohio State Med. Soc., Cincinnati Acad. Medicine, Beta Theta Pi. Republican. Presbyterian. Mason (32°). Home: Oxford, O. Died Nov. 24, 1949. In 1951 and continuing until 1970 Cook Place was the official residence for the Provost of Miami University. It then became the Office of Residence Halls.

    Culler Hall

    Joseph Albertus Culler 1858-1937

    Culler Hall, occupied in 1961 by the Departments of Physics and Mathematics, was named for the first Professor of Physics in Miami's history. His biography, as it appears in Who Was Who in America, 1897-1942, reads as follows: CULLER, Joseph Albertus, univ. prof.; b. on farm in Wayne Co., O., Mar. 5, 1858; s. Michael and Barbara C.; A. B., U. of Wooster, 1884, later A. M., Ph. D., 1900; m. Isabella Carnes, 1887. Prin. high schs., Cambridge, O., 1884-85, Kenton, O., 1885-1900; supt. schs., Kenton, O., 1900-01, Bowling Green, O., 1901-03; prof. physics, Miami U., 1903-26, emiritus. Presbyn., Republican. Author: 1st, 2d and 3d Book of Physiology, 1904; First Book in Physics, 1905; High School Book of Physics, 1906; General Physics for Colleges, Mechanics and Heat, 1909; Electricity, Electromagnetic Waves and Sound, 1913; Physics for College Freshmen, 1922. Home: Oxford, O. Died May 18, 1937. Dr. Culler's death was attributed to the cumulative effects of burns suffered in connection with his research activities conducted both before ad after his retirement. His major interest centered around radium.

    Dennison Hall

    William Dennison 1815-1882

    Although Dennison Hall is the center building of a residence hall complex including Collins and McBride Halls, it was the last to be constructed. The main building was completed in 1958 and the dining room added in 1959. Dedication ceremonies were held in June, 1961. Biographies of William Dennison appear in the Centennial Edition of the Miami University Alumni Catalogue; Who was Who in America, Historical Volume 1607-1896; the Dictionary of American Biography, Volume III; and the National Cyclopaedia of American Biography. The sketch appearing in the Alumni Catalog identifies this alumnus as a member of Alpha Delta Phi and reads as follows: A. B., 1935, A. M., 1844. Admitted to the bar, Cincinnati, 1840. Practiced law at Columbus, 1840-48, 1866-82. State Senator of Ohio, 1848-50. Presidential Elector, 1852 and 1856, Delegate to Republican Presidential Conventions, 1856, 1864 and 1880. Chairman of the Convention of 1864. Governor of Ohio, 1860-64. Appointed by President Lincoln U. S. Postmaster-General, 1864. Resigned, 1866. President Columbus Exchange Bank. President of Columbus & Xenia R. R. Contributed largely of his means to Dennison Coll., Granville, O. Delivered address before Miami Univ. Alumni Association, 1851. Born, Cincinnati, O., Nov. 23, 1815. Died, June 15, 1882. Other facts of interest are that Governor Dennison married the daughter of William Neil of Columbus shortly after being admitted to the bar, and that, although best known as a politician, he acquired a considerable fortune as a businessman. He was a pioneer promotor of railroads including the Hocking Valley as well as the Columbus & Xenia line that he served as president. An enterprise of another type in which he was influential in establishing was the Columbus Rolling Mills.

    Dodds Hall

    Ozro J. Dodds 1840-1882

    The following information was taken from the program for the dedication of the buildings facing the South Quadrangle of the South Campus of Miami University on September 16, 1961: Ozro Jennison Dodds, class of 1861, as a senior organized and led the Miami Rifles, first unit to enter the Union Army from the campus. After the war he became a lawyer, practicing in Cincinnati. He was a member of the Ohio House of Representatives, 1872-74, and a trustee of Miami University, 1875-1882. A more complete biography appears in Who was Who, Historical Volume, 16-7-1896. In this volume the name Ozro John Dodds is used. Dodds, Ozro John, congressman, lawyer; b. Cincinnati, Mar. 22, 1940; attended Miami U., Oxford, O., 4 years, received degree after Civil War; attended Cincinnati Law Sch. Organized Capt. Dodds' Univ. Co. during Civil War, enlisted as capt. Co. B., 20th Ohio Volunteer Regt., 1861; served as capt. Co. F, 81st Ohio Volunteer Inf., and acting asst. q. m., 1861-63; promoted 1t. col. 1st Ala. Union Cavalry, 1863; admitted to bar, 1866, began practice of law, Cincinnati; mem. Ohio Ho. of Reps., 1870-71; mem. U. S. Ho. of Reps. (Democrat, filled vacancy) from Ohio, 42nd Congress, Oct. 8, 1872-73. Died Columbus, O., Apr. 18, 1882; buried Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati. The Miami University Alumni Catalogue, Centennial Edition, uses the middle name Jenison rather than John. It also notes that he delivered an address before the Alumni Association of Miami University in 1870 and was the orator at the reunion of the Army of the Tennessee, 1881.

    Dorsey Hall

    James Maxwell Dorsey 1776-1857

    The following information was taken from The Post & Times-Star, Cincinnati, Thursday, March 30, 1961. Miami University has begun construction of Dorsey Hall, which will house 243 women in Miami's East Campus. Bids on the project total $1,034,074. It is part of a housing expansion program for which Miami has borrowed $9,100,000. The building is named for James Maxwell Dorsey (1776-1857), who established and taught the first school on the University grounds here, supervised construction of Miami's first building and was first treasurer of the University. The Centennial Edition of the Miami University Catalogue devotes a page to the Select School and Mr. Dorsey that appears as follows: MIAMI UNIVERSITY Select School 1811-1818 Principal James Maxwell Dorsey, Teacher, Piqua, O.

    Teacher Baltimore, Md. for several years prior to 1809. Removed to Cincinnati 1809. Principal of a "Select School," conducted in a building erected for the purpose by the University Trustees on the Campus of Miami Univ., Oxford, O., 1811-1818. Supt. of Construction during erection of college buildings of Miami Univ., 1818-24. Treasurer of Miami Univ., 1824-27. An organizer of the Society of "Rational Brethren of Oxford," 1816. Removed to New Harmony, Ind., and was associated with Robert Dale Owen, 1830-33. Resided Greenville, O., 1833-45; Piqua, O., 1845-57. Born, Baltimore county, Md., 1776. Died, Piqua, O., 1857. The present location of Dorsey Hall, facing Cook Field, was not the original site for this building when it was in the planning stage. It was supposed to face the drive leading to Fisher Hall but this location would have necessitated the removal of a magnificent bald cypress tree. The vigorous protest of the University's superintendent of grounds was heeded and the tree still stands.

    Edwards House

    Ray Lee Edwards 1885 - 1969

    The Edwards House at 22 North Tallawanda was built in 1923 and acquired by Dr. Edwards when he joined the faculty of Miami University in 1926. He and his family lived here for more than twenty years but he then sold the house to the Delta Chi Fraternity and built a new home on Chestnut Street. In 1971 the University purchased the Edwards House and it served as the Speech and Hearing Clinic until the construction of Bachelor Hall. Currently the Offices of Student Aid occupy the building. The biography of Dr. Edwards as it appears in Who's Who in America, Vol. 31, 1960-61, covers his career at Miami. EDWARDS, Ray Lee, prof. physics; b. Forest Grove, Ore., Nov. 12, 1885; s. Darius Lyman and Mary Imogene (Houghton) E; A. B., Oberlin Coll., 1908; B. S., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1909; A. M., Ohio State Univ., 1911; Ph. D., University of Iowa, 1925; m. Winifred Julia Knight, Aug. 23, 1911; children--Jean Allice (Mrs. Mason Quebedaux), Lawrence Knight, Harold Houghton. Science teacher, 1908-10; prof. physics, Park Coll., Parksville, Mo., 1911-26; asst. instr. physics, U. of Chicago, summers 1921-23; instr. physics, U. of Ia., 1924-25; prof. and chmn. dept. physics, Miami U., Oxford, O., 1925-56, emeritus 1956--; visiting prof Ohio State U., summer 1942, U. of Illinois, summer 1951, Colo. U., 1956-57, Beloit College, 1957-59, vis. lecturer, Duke Univ., 1959--. Fellow Ohio Acad. of Science (vice president 1933, 1943, and 1948); mem. Am. Phys. Soc., Am. Assn. Physics Teachers, A. A. A. S., Am. Assn. Univ. Profs., Sigma Xi, Gamma Alpha. Presbyterian. Associate editor Am. Jour. of Physics, 1945-47. Has pub. original research in mechanics, liquid viscosities, and magnetism; articles on teaching of physics, 1945. Home: 414 E. Chesnut St., Oxford, Ohio; also 1935 Crest Rd., Beloit, Wis. After two years at Duke Dr. Edwards taught one year at Trinity College in San Antonio, Texas and two years at Harvey Mudd (Professor Emeritus) before retiring a second time. During this long teaching career he sent more students to MIT and Cal. Teach. than any other teacher in the world. He died April 14, 1969 in Claremont, California.

    Elliott Hall

    Charles Elliott 1815-1892

    The oldest building on the campus, Elliott Hall was completed in 1829. It was remodeled on various occasions and completely renovated in 1937. Originally designated as Washington & Clinton Hall, it was commonly called the Northeast Building or North Dorm. Between 1873 and 1885 when Miami was closed it was named Washington Hall but the term North Dorm persisted. In 1912 the building was divided into two parts and the north end was called Johnson Hall and the south end Elliott Hall thus honoring two distinguished former faculty members. After the remodeling in 1937 the entire building was called Elliott Hall. Dr. Elliott is identified in the Centennial Edition of the Miami University Alumni Catalogue as a minister from Easton, Pa., and a member of Alpha Delta Phi and Phi Delta Theta. The reference to Phi Delta Theta is particularly appropriate as a plaque on the outside west wall of Elliott Hall marks the room where the fraternity was founded in 1848. Additional biographical information from the catalogue is as follows: A. B., Lafayette, Coll., 1840. A. M. D. D., Ohio Univ., 1861. LL. D., Hanover Coll., 1891. B. D., Princeton Theol. Sem., 1841. Ordained Evangelist, Presbytery of Oxford, April, 1858. Stated Supply, College Corner, O., 1861-63. Principal Academy, Xenia, O., 1843-45; Lane Seminary, 1845-47. Prof. Belles-lettres, Univ. Pittsburg, 1847-49. Prof. of Greek Language and Literature and of Logic, Miami Univ., 1849-63. Prof. of Biblical Literature, and Exegesis, McCormick Theol. Sem., Chicago, Ill. 1863-82. Prof. of Hebrew, Lafayette Coll., Easton, Pa., 1882-92. Author of "The Sabbath," 1866; part of "Lange's Commentary on the Bible," 1874; "Inspiration of the Scriptures," 1877; "Biblical Hermeneutics," 1879; "Mosaic Authorship of Pentateuch," 1884; Member American Oriental Society; Philosophical Society of Great Britain; Victoria Institute, London; American Society of Biblical Literature. Born, Castleton, Scotland, March 18, 1815. Died, February 15, 1892.

    Emerson Hall

    Bertha Metcalf Emerson 1887-1973

    On June 7, 1968 the Board of Trustees took action naming Residence Hall #16 in honor of Bertha Metcalf Emerson who, for twenty-two years shared the supervision of Miami women with Dean Hamilton and then for four years before she, too, retired, headed women's affairs. A "proper Bostonian," Dean Emerson was loyal and respected by countless students. As head of Wells Hall for twenty years she had close personal contact with hundreds of upperclass girls and their swains as well. A biography of Miss Emerson would read as follows: b. Waltham, Mass., June 26, 1887. Simmons College 1906-1910, B. S., 1910. Radcliffe College 1918-1922, A. M., 1923. Sept.-Nov. 1910, Assistant to Editor of Massachusetts Historical Society; 1910-1913, Secretary in Office of the President, Harvard University; 1913-1922, Instructor in Secretarial Department of Simmons College; 1923 Feb.-June, Secretary in Alumni Office of Carleton College; with Miami Univ. from 1923 to 1949 as Asst. Dean of Women and Asst. Prof. of Secretarial Studies, 1923-40, Head of Wells Hall, 1923-43, Acting Dean of Women 1926-27, 1939-40, and 1945-46, Assoc. Prof. of Sec. Stud., 1940-49, Associate Director of Student Affairs, 1946-49. Retired as Emeritus Professor in 1949 to Pemaquid Point, Maine. Congregational. Died in Damariscotta, Maine, January 19, 1973. The Bertha M. Emerson Hall was dedicated on Nov. 1, 1969 and it was appropriate that the key was turned over to President Shriver by the then only woman member of the Board of Trustees, Lucile Crowell Cooks. On the same day the A. K. Morris Hall was dedicated. For a period of twenty-three years these two individuals were co-workers concerned with student affairs.

    Finkelman Auditorium

    Dave Finkelman 1903 - 1964

    Shortly after the sudden death of Dave Finkelman on December 28, 1964 his widow indicated to Mr. Logan T. Johnston, Chairman of the campaign to raise funds for the Middletown campus of Miami University, that she was interested in creating a memorial for her husband. Officials of Miami indicated the desirability of an auditorium. Construction was started in 1967 and the building was dedicated in 1969. Dave Finkelman's biography as it appeared in the 1965 edition of Who's Who in World Jewry reads as follows: FINKELMAN, Dave, U. S., business executive: b. Koroshov, Russia, Sept. 2, 1903; s. Harry and Lena (Katlarsky); in U. S. since 1912; m. Gladys Fisher, Dec. 23, 1928. Owner, real estate and insurance firm, since 1923; pres. and dir., Citizen's Bldg. and Loan Assn., 1959. Chmn. Middletown UJA campaigns; bd member: YMCA; Salvation Army; Middletown Hospital; member: Middletown Real Estate Bd; Temple Israel, Dayton, O,; E'nai B'rith. Club, Rotary, bd member, 1959. Home: 2800 Superior Ave., Middletown, Ohio. Office: 1213 Central Ave., Middletown, Ohio. The above biography does not mention that Mr. Finkelman was a generous contributor to many worthwhile projects and was considered to be an outstanding civic leader in Middletown.

    Fisher Hall

    Elam Fisher 1846-1923

    Any account of Fisher Hall is likely to be a lengthy description of the various uses made of this historic building by several owners. Miami University acquired it in March, 1926 from Dr. R. Harvey Cook who had been using it as a sanitarium. It was remodeled for dormitory use and occupied in September, 1927 by freshmen. At that time it was named for Judge Elam Fisher, a trustee of Miami for 36 years. Shortly after his death the following obituary appeared in the August, 1923 Miami University Alumni News Letter: Judge Elam Fisher died at this home in Eaton, Ohio on Thursday, May 10, 1923. He received the degree Bachelor of Arts at Miami in 1870 and the Master of Arts degree in 1886. In 1872 he was given the degree of LL.B. from the University of Michigan, and in 1917 the degree LL.D. from Ohio University. On May 9, 1872 at Evansville, Indiana, he was married to Miss Maria Still, who survives him. The same year he began the practice of law in his home town, Eaton. He was counsel for the C. H, and D. Railroad, director and counsel of the Eaton National Bank, President of the Eaton Lighting Company, and director and treasurer of the Eaton Telephone Company, member of the Ohio House of Representatives 1891-1894, member of the Torrens Land Commission 1894-96, and judge of the court of common please, second judicial district of Ohio, for eighteen years. Judge Fisher was a member of Company D, 156th O. V. I. in the Civil War and the G. A. R. in later years. He served faithfully as a trustee of Miami University for 36 years since 1887. His educational work also included faithful duty as trustee of Oxford for Women, being chosen to that duty in 1908. He was a member of the State Bar Association, Preble County Bar Association, and its president in 1910 and 1911, member of the Ohio Electric Light Association. He was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity, Methodist Church, and a thirty-second degree Mason. The above obituary fails to state that Elam Fisher was born on July 26, 1846.

    Flower Hall

    Olive Flower 1875-1964

    The most northerly of all student residences, Flower Hall was occupied in September, 1966 and dedicated with appropriate ceremonies on April 15, 1967. Mill Olive Flower, for whom the building was named, was born in Proctorville, Ohio, August 17, 1875. She received an A. P. degree from Oxford College in 1897 and went on to Smith College to earn an additional A. B. degree in 1901. She then became a chemistry teacher at Oxford College and continued to teach through 1918. From 1906 to 1928 she was also the registrar and from 1919 to 1928 served s the dean of Oxford College. After the merger with Miami University in 1928 she became assistant registrar at Miami until she retired in 1946. Miss Flower was the author of History of Oxford College for Women published in 1948 and regularly prepared Oxford College notes for the Miami Alumnus. Her efforts were instrumental in perpetuating the identity of Oxford College alumnae while, at the same time, obtaining from them their loyalty to Miami University. In 1947 the Bishop Medal was presented to her in recognition of her scholarship and service. In 1952 Miami gave her name to the chapel in the Oxford College Building, where she had lived for many years. Although she suffered a loss of hearing in her later years, Miss Flower was always cheerful and friendly. She died December 29, 1964 at the Hamilton (Ohio) Community Home. Irvin Hall

    Horace A. Irvin 1855-1925

    Irvin Hall was designed as the perfect recitation building with faculty offices on the inside corridor and classrooms on the outside. The north and central sections were built in 1925 and the south wing was completed in 1928. The building was named for Horace A. Irvin who was chairman of the building committee of the Board of Trustees at the time of his death in 1925. He had been a valued member of the board since 1896 and had had a large responsibility for every building on the campus in 1925 with the exception of part of what was then called Old Main and the two old dormitories. Mr. Irvin was born February 17, 1855 and attended Miami University for two years, 1871 and 1872. He is officially listed as ex '74 as the University closed its doors in 1873. In 1900 the University awarded him the A. M. degree. After serving as secretary for several years of Lowe Brothers Co., paint manufacturers, in Dayton he founded and became president of the Irvin, Jewell and Vinson Co., makers of Anchor paints and colors. In addition to business activities he was a trustee of the Westminster Presbyterian Church, a director of the Merchants National Bank, a thirty-third degree Mason, and a member of Alpha Delta Phi. He gave much time and interest to philanthropic and civic enterprises. Mr. Irvin died on May 13, 1925.

    Gardner House

    Colin Gardner, Jr. 1886-1968

    The Gardner House, called Colonial Hall when it was built in 1892 by Colin Gardner, Sr., is located in the City of Middletown approximately three miles from the Miami University - Middletown campus. I was donated to the University by Colin Gardner, Jr. Colin Gardner, Jr. was born in Middletown on June 30, 1886. The son of Colin Gardner, Sr. and Elizabeth Tytus Gardner, he was one of three boys born to this couple. After attending the University of Cincinnati for a year he entered the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University and received a Bachelor of Science Degree in 1909. On April 6, 1911 he married Ethel Ames and two sons and two daughters were born to this union. In 1923 Mr. Gardner married a second time to a Miss Elinor Vandergrift and one son was born to this couple. After graduation from Yale Mr. Gardner joined the Colin Gardner Paper Co. as a timekeeper. Subsequently he became a treasurer, vice president for sales, and in 1950 was named executive vice president. From 1954 to 1957 he served as president of the company at which time it merged with the Diamond Match Co. to become the Diamond Gardner Co. He then served as president of the Gardner Division and remained in this capacity when a merger with the United States Printing & Lithographing Co. resulted in a name change to the Diamond National Corporation. Mr. Gardner was active in the Middletown community as a director of the First National Bank, Chairman of the American Red Cross, president of the Brown's Run Country Club, and a board member of the I. M. C. A. He was a charter member of the board of trustees of the Middletown Hospital and became its treasurer. On the national scene he was president of the Folding Box Association of America, 1938-39, and was a member of the Office of Price Stabilization Committee of the U. S. boxboard industry. He was also a member of the National Production Authority and a director of the Boxboard Research and Development Association. He died July 25, 1968 at the age of 82.

    Gardner-Harvey Library

    Colin Gardner, Sr. 1838-1919 George Henry Harvey 1866-1948

    The campus of Miami University - Middletown originally consisted of two buildings - Johnston Hall and the Gardner-Harvey Library. The latter building had not been originally planned but was made possible by a substantial gift from the Gardner-Harvey Foundation. This Foundation had been established to honor two men who were outstanding leaders in the papermaking industry. Colin Gardner

    A condensed biography of Colin Gardner, Sr. might read as follows: Born in Carthage (Cincinnati), Ohio November 7, 1938 the son of James Brewster and Elizabeth (Ludlow) Gardner. Married Elizabeth Tytus Dec. 6, 1870 and this union produced three sons, Edwart T., Colin, Jr., and Robert Brewster. Partner in dry goods firm of Geo. W. Jones & Co., Cincinnati, 1857-1870. Moved to Middletown and from 1872 to 1900 served the Tytus Paper Co. as vice-president and president although by 1900 the name had been changed to the Tytus-Gardner Paper and Manufacturing Co. In 1900 he joined his son Edward and George H. Harvey to form a new company that in 1906 became the Gardner-Harvey Paper Co. In 1917 he organized still another company - the Gardner Paper Board Co. He served the first two companies as president and then in 1917 became chairman of the board of all three. A lifelong Baptist he was a layman in his church. He served briefly in the Civil War. He devoted much attention to community affairs and contributed generously to charitable causes. In 1919 he was taken seriously ill in Palm Beach, Florida and returned to his permanent home "Colonial Hill" in Middletown where he died on March 7, 1919, leaving a nationwide reputation in the papermaking industry. George H. Harvey

    A brief biography of George Henry Harvey includes the following details: Born in Wardsworth, England, March 11, 1866; son of Thomas Harvey and Frances (Roberta) Harvey. Married Elisa Jane Ross of West Springfield, Massachusetts on May 5, 1891 and they were the parents of one son, Arthur Ross Harvey. In 1872 the family had moved to the United States and young George worked in several paper making mills in the east. In 1896 he came to Middletown and joined Colin Gardner, Sr. in the operation of the Tytus-Gardner Paper and Mfg. Co. He became so valuable an employee that he was a full partner when the Gardner-Harvey Paper Co. was formed in 1906. In 1918 when Colin Gardner, Sr. retired from the various companies he headed Mr. Harvey became general manager of all of the organizations. In 1924 when the companies he headed Mr. Harvey became general manager of all of the organizations. In 1924 when the companies joined with the Universal Paper Products Co. he served the new organization as treasurer and production manager. A Methodist, Mr. Harvey was a life member of the I. M. C. A., a founder of the Middletown Hospital, a Mason, and a Republican. A generous contributor to civic, charitable, religious, and educational causes, he remained active until his death on November 30, 1948 in Middletown.

    Gaskill Hall

    David L. Gaskill 1863-1939

    A wing of the present Gaskill Hall was occupied in 1925 at which time it was called the Industrial Arts Building. In 1948-49 the name was changed to the Fred C. Whitcomb Laboratories. Subsequently additions were made to the building in 1951 and again in 1959 at which time the entire structure was named Gaskill Hall. David L. Gaskill was born in 1863 in Troy, Ohio but moved to Greenville in 1890 and began the practice of law there the following year. He was a graduate of Ohio State University. In 1907 he was appointed to the Board of Trustees of Miami University and served 32 years. He was elected president of the board in 1937 and served in this capacity until his death on March 9, 1939. Mr. Gaskill founded the Greenville Electric Light Company and served as its president until 1927 when the company was absorbed. For many years he was an influential member of the Greenville Board of Education and also was elected for a term of office as president of the Ohio State Association and was a thirty-third degree Mason. His obituary published in the May, 1939 Miami University Bulletin stated: "As a member of the Board of Trustees his long experience and large abilities contributed much to the progress and growth of the University. His interest in the institution during his 32 years of service never waned, and until infirmities prevented, he gave unreservedly of his time to his duties on the Board." At the time of his death he was survived by his widow and four children, Helen, ex-'08, Mary Gaskill Prugh, '13, and David, ex-'16.

    Goggin Ice Arena

    Lloyd A(lbert) Goggin

    Construction on a three million dollar ice arena began in 1975 and the facility became available for use November 1, 1976. A formal dedication took place December 10, 1976. The person most responsible for the project, including financing, was Mr. Lloyd A. Goggin, Vice President for Finance and Business Affairs and Treasurer, Miami University. Consequently, it was most appropriate when the Board of Trustees took action on June 15, 1984 naming the facility the Lloyd A. Goggin Ice Arena. Lloyd A. Goggin was born in Randolph, Maine on Nov. 16, 1918, the son of George W. and Susan Lewis Goggin. After graduation from the Gardiner (Maine) high school he worked for the Commonwealth Shoe and Leather Co. in Gardiner for four years. In 1940 he entered the Bentley School of Accounting and Finance but his college career was cut short by military service. Entering the army as a private he was discharged as a Captain having graduated from the Finance OCS at Duke University. He then entered Bowdoin College and this institution conferred the A.B. degree on him in 1951. In 1963 he earned the M.B.A. degree at Miami. His career at Miami began in 1947 when he was named Comptroller. In 1956 he was made Treasurer and in 1966 his title was changed to Vice President for Finance and Business Affairs as well as Treasurer. After thirty-five years of service to Miami he retired in 1982. During his years in Oxford Mr. Goggin gave generously of his time and abilities to many organizations at the local, state, and national levels. He was a director and past president of the Oxford United Appeal, director of the Oxford Chamber of Commerce, director and past president of the McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital, treasurer of the Miami University Pulp and Paper Foundation, and a member of the Kiwanis and Rotary clubs. Miami University recognized his services to the alumni program by awarding him the A. K. Morris Award in 1976 and the City of Oxford named him Citizen of the Years in 1976. Outside of Oxford he served as a member of the Board of Directors of the Citizens Bank in Hamilton, as a member of the Central Ohio River Valley Health Planning Association, Miami Conservancy District (past president), Butler County TB Program, Central Ass'n. of College and University Business Officers (past president), National Association of College and University Business Officers (past president), National Association of College and University Business Officers, Southwest Ohio Regional Computer Center, College Entrance Examination Board, Ohio Student Loan Commission, and was past chairman of the Council on Business Affairs of the Nat'l. Ass'n. of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges. His memberships include Beta Gamma Sigma, Beta Alpha Psi, Phi Kappa Phi, Omicron Delta Kappa and the University Club of Columbus. Married to June Gallant on July 30, 1943 he is the father of four children, Pamela (Mrs. James G. Robinson) '66, Paul '70, Patricia (Mrs. Martin Robles) '71, and Penelope (Mrs. John Forker). In 1975 the students recognized Mr. and Mrs. Goggin by naming them Parents of the Year.

    Hahne Hall

    Ernest Herman Hahne 1890-1952

    Hahne Hall was dedicated on April 15, 1967. It was named after the fifteenth president of Miami University who had died in office almost fifteen years earlier. The biography of Dr. Hahne as it appears in Who Was Who, Volume III, 1951-60, reads as follows: Hahne, Ernest Herman, univ. pres.; b. Walker, Kan., Oct. 20, 1890; e. Herman and Virginia (Kitchen) II.; A. B.,U. of Neb., 1911, LL. B., 1913; A. M., Harvard University, 1914; Ph; Ph D., University of Chicago, 1930; LL. D., Ripon College, 1950; m. Helen Madeline Jess, July 2, 1917; children--Dorothy Joan, Ruth Elizabeth. Asst. in economics, U. of Chicago, 1915-16; chmn. Dept. of Economics and Sociology, Dak. Wesleyan U., Mitchell, S. D., 1916-18; instr. in economics, Northwestern U., 1919-22, asst. prof., 1924-29, assoc. prof. 1929-35, prof. 1935-46; also asst. dean College Liberal Arts, 1925-30, dir. summer session 1930-39; engaged in research in spl. assessments, U. of Chicago 1922-24; now pres. Miami Univ., Oxford, Ohio; dir. Cincinnati br., Cleveland Fed. Reserve Bank, 1948. Administration member of national code authority under N. R. A. for cotton cloth glove, academic costume, and household ice refrigerator industries, special assessment and federal tax consultant; mem. research staff; Rep. National Committee, 1944. Member Headquarters Company, 354th Regiment, 89th Division, and personnel officer 7th (dev.) Patt., Camp Dix, N. J., for alien enemies, World War I. Pres. Assn., Am. Assn. of Summer Session Dirs., 1934. Mem. Am. Econ. Assn., Farm Econ. Assn., Am. Assn. of Univ. Profs., Nat. Tax Assn., Am. Legion, Phi Delta Phi, Beta Gamma Sigma, Delta Sigma Rho, Phi Beta Kappa, Acacia. Methodist. Mason. Clubs: University (Cincinnati); Kiwanis. Contr. to encyclopedia and author of articles on finance. Home: Lewis Pl. Office: Miami Univ., Oxford, O. Died Nov. 25, 1952. Dr. Hahne's warmth and sincerity is not revealed in the above biography. Also, it does not mention that during his somewhat short years as president he can be credited with establishing a Graduate School with its own dean, the Miami University Foundation, and a long overdue reorganization of the administration.

    Hall Auditorium

    John W. Hall 1802-1886

    Hall Auditorium is named for the fifth president of Miami University. Although a southerner, he served during the years of the civil war. He was a Presbyterian minister as were his four predecessors. In Old Miami, Dr. Upham wrote about President Hall as follows: "Doctor Hall, a fine Southern gentleman of the old school, who with rare tact and splendid self-control had directed the affairs of this patriotic northern college, found at last, when the struggle was over, that hostility had arisen and his usefulness was ended." His vita as published in the Centennial Edition of the Miami University Alumni Catalogue reads as follows: DD., Miami Univ., 1848. Studied theology with Dr. Gidean Blackburn and was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of West Tennessee, Oct. 1824. Evangelist in West Tenn. 1824-26; Pastor, Murfreesboro, Tenn., 1826-30; Gallatin, Tenn., 1830-1840. Organized and acted as President of a Female Seminary at Gallatin, 1837-40. Organized and acted as President of a Female Seminary at Gallatin, 1837-40. Pastor Dayton, O., 1840-52; Huntsville, Ala., 1852-54. President Miami Univ., 1854-66. Supt. Public Schools, Covington, Ky., 1866-76. Born, Orange County, N. C., Jan. 19, 1802. Died, Jan. 6, 1886. The building now known as Hall Auditorium was completed in 1908 and for eighteen years was called either the Administration Building or the Auditorium. In September of 1926 it was named Benton Hall, after the twelfth president, and was so designated until 1969 when the Benton name was shifted to a new classroom building. Hamilton Hall

    Elizabeth W. Hamilton 1873-1970

    Originally known as North Hall, the woman's residence hall built in 1940 was named Hamilton Hall in 1948. Although Dean Hamilton had retired in 1945, the naming of a building for a living person was an exception to the rules that then prevailed. Elizabeth W. Hamilton was born in Gallipolis, Ohio on August 23, 1873. She was graduated from Oxford College in 1895 with two degrees, a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Science in Music. Subsequently she did graduate work at the University of Chicago and at Miami University. The LL. D. degree was conferred on her by Western College in 1934 and Miami University in 1945. From 1897 to 1905 Miss Hamilton taught Greek and English at Oxford College and was its dean 1904-05. She joined the Miami University staff in 1905 as the Dean of Women and served in this capacity for 40 years until her retirement in 1945. She also held faculty rank as an assistant professor of Greek, and later as an assistant professor of English. Dean Hamilton was active for many years in the American Association of University Women serving as fellowship chairman of the local chapter for 20 years and of the state for 12 years. She was Ohio AAUW president 1937-39 and this organization established an endowment in her name for an international fellowship. In 1929 she served on a Council of One Hundred Women at the National Assembly of the Presbyterian Church and helped to formulate policies that gave women wider participation in the government of that denomination. She served the National Association of Deans of Women as chairman of the university section and as president of the Ohio Association of Deans of Women. Other affiliations included the Oxford Women's Club, the Arts Club, and the Music Club. She was the Presbyterian Church organist for twenty years. After retirement Dean Hamilton spent most of her time at Kittery Point, Maine where she died December 2, 1970 at the age of 97. She will long be affectionately remembered by generations of Miami students. As Miami's first dean of women she discharged the changing responsibilities of this office with rare tact, skill, and diplomacy.

    Reference; Buildings; "A Study of Oxford House Signs Poiting to Students' Values," by Reginald D. Olson; 2000

    Reference; Buildings; "The Houses of Miami University," by K. Gustafson; 2010

    Preface

    In 1948 the Administrative Council appointed a sub-committee on Names for University Buildings. Members were Bertha M. Emerson, C. W. Kreger, W. F. Cottrell, and R. E. Glos, Chairman. A second committee was appointed in 1951 consisting of Belva Lind, Helen Page, C. W. Kreger, H. C. Brill, and R. E. Glos, Chairman. In 1967 the Board of Trustees established a Committee on Naming of Buildings. Members were Edward Nippert and William Anderson as alumni representatives, Walter Havighurst and R. E. Glos representing the faculty, with Mrs. Lucile Cooks from the Board of Trustees as Chairman. President Shriver served as an ex-officio member and, beginning in 1969, Mrs. John Dolibois, Vice President for Development and Alumni Affairs, met regularly with the Committee. In 1973 the composition of the Committee was changed as Nessrs. Nippert and Anderson were unable to attend meetings. New members were Ralph N. Fey, Karl E. Limper, and Gordon D. Wilson. This historical background is given to explain my long-standing interest in the names attached to buildings of Miami University. Previously others have had a similar interest and have prepared reports. Probably the oldest is a mimeographed list of buildings possibly for use by visitors to the campus. It has all the earmarks of a document prepared by Miss Marie Marshall and appears to have been dated between 1933 and 1936. Only a brief statement is made about each building and the person for whom it is named is merely identified. In later years a mimeographed list of buildings was titled "Tour" and its numbers doubtless correspond with the members used to identify the buildings on a University map. Again, identification of the individuals concerned was very brief. In 1963, judging from buildings named, an unknown author provided a manuscript titled "The Historical Facts of Miami's Building Names." This was followed in 1965 by an excellent report headed "Miami Buildings, Past and Present - Being a Summary of Some Names and Dates Associated with Them." This was the work of Peter Flintermann, Reference Librarian. In 1968 Mrs. Kay Irwin, Secretary to the President, prepared a manuscript titled "Miami University Facilities." By far the most complete of all studies of University buildings, a considerable number of facets are given about each structure as date of construction, cost, use, square and cubic footage, and sources of funds. In addition, attention is given to the individual for whom the building was named. Mrs. Irwin's manuscript listed her sources of information as follows: Miami University Alumni Catalogue, Centennial Edition, 1809-1909; Alumni Directory, 1826-1873, 1888-1940; Annual Reports of the President (1898-1964); Catalogue of the University; The History of Oxford College for Women by Olive Flower; Men of Old Miami by John D. Millett; The Miami Years by Walter Havighurst; Minutes of the Board of Trustees; Old Miami by Alfred H. Upham; Old Oxford Houses by Ophia D. Smith; and Recensios. All of these sources as well as many others have been used to compile the biographies attached. The Miami University Bulletin - Alumni News Letters and the volumes of Who Was Who in America have been extremely helpful. The Dictionary of American Biography, and the National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, County historical volumes, and obituaries printed in the Oxford Press sometimes provided information. The card file of former faculty members that had been maintained by Miss Marie Marshall proved invaluable in specific instances as did the news releases provided by Mr. Robert Howard of the News Bureau. In view of the several studies already made it might well be asked why another one has been prepared. The answer is that each one mentioned divided attention between the building itself and the man or woman for whom it was named. This resulted, in numerous instances, in a failure to provide adequate coverage of the life of the individual concerned. Although the following biographies do mention the buildings, emphasis has been given to such details as dates of birth and death, education, and career details of the person for whom buildings have been named.

    Anderson Hall

    William C. Anderson 1804-1870

    William C. Anderson was the fourth President of the University, 1849-1854. As a Presbyterian minister since 1827, he had held a number of pastorates, coming to Miami from Dayton. His administration was marked by his warm friendliness and understanding of students (he introduced cricket, fencing, boxing and wrestling), and by his practically in managing the University's meager finances, in which he was assisted by his son John, of the class of 1853, who also became a minister and a university president (of the present Kansas State University, Manhattan, 1873-78). The above information was taken from the program for the dedication of the buildings facing the South Quadrangle of the South Campus of Miami University on September 16, 1961. A more detailed vita is found in the Centennial Edition of the Miami University Catalogue, which reads as follows: A. B., Washington Coll., 1824. A. M., Miami Univ., 1834. D. D., Miami Univ., 1846. Licensed by Presbytery of Washington, Pa., Dec. 13, 1827. Missionary in North Carolina, 1828-29. Agent, Presb. Board 1829-31. Pastor Presb. Church, Pigeon Creek, Pa., 1831-36. General Agent of the Western Foreign Missionary Board, 1836-37. Pastor Presb. churches, Pittsburgh, 1837-39; New Albany, Ind., 1839-43. Prof. Rhetoric, Hanover Coll., 1843-44. Pastor Fort Wayne, Inc., and Washington, Pa., 1844-45. Pastor Dayton, O., 1845-49. President Miami Univ., 1849-54. Pastor Chillicothe, O., 1854-55. Pastor San Francisco, 1855-63; Pastor Cincinnati, 1863-64; New Albany, Ind., 1864-65. Supply at Abilene and Manhattan, Ken., 1866-70. Porn, Washington Co., Pa. Aug. 18, 1804. Died Aug. 28, 1870. Father of Rev. John A. Anderson, class of '53.

    Another reference contains the following information: "Before William Anderson became Miami's President, the University was in a slump with only 68 students - an all time low. Within his administration enrollment reached 266." "Brilliant, popular, and prosperous" were terms used to describe his five years in the presidency. The present residence hall is the second one to hear the name Anderson Hall, which had been built in 1919 as a temporary structure, was renamed Anderson Hall in 1948. This building was demolished in 1961 to make room for Warfield Hall.

    Benton Hall

    Guy Potter Benton 1865-1927

    Benton Hall is named for Guy Potter Benton, twelfth president of the University, 1902-1911. The year he became president the total student enrollment was 124. There were but five buildings on the campus and the total student enrollment was 124. When he resigned nine years later to become president of the University of Vermont, the student enrollment had increased to more than 1,200. The income had advanced to approximately a quarter of a million dollars, and seven modern buildings had been erected in response to a constantly growing University constituency. His vita as published in the First Edition of Who Was Who in America reads as follows: Penton, Guy Potter, univ. pres.; b. Kenton, O., May 26, 1865. s. Daniel Webster and Harriet (Wharton) B.; A. B. Naker U.; A. M. Ohio Wesleyan; also studied U. of Wooster and in Berlin; D. D. Baker, 1900, Ohio Wesleyan U. 1905; LL. D. Upper Iowa U., 1906, U. of Vt., 1911, Middlebury Coll., 1912, U. of Mass., 1914; Miami U., 1916; L. H. D., Norwich U., 1916; m. Dollar Konantz, Sept. 4, 1889; children - Mrs. Helen Minnich, Paulin. Supt. of schools, Ft. Scott Kan., 1890-95; asst. state supt. pub. instrn., Kan., 1895-96; prof. history and sociology, Baker U., 1896-99; pres. Upper Iowa U., 1899-1902, Miami U., 1902-1911; pres. U. of Vt., 1911-1919; chief edul. consultant, pres. U. of Phillipines, 1921-24; retired. With A. E. F. 1917-19; gen. sec. Y. M. C. A. for City of Paris, Sept., Oct., and Nov., 1917; chief, organizing sec. for Y. M. C. A. with membership on staff of Brig. Gen. Sample, comdr. in chief of advance sect., A. E. F., Nov. 1917-June 1919; chief sec. 8th region, A. E. F. 1919; mem. U. S. Army Edul. Corps and chief edul. dir. Am. Army of Occupation with hdqrs. at Coblenz, Germany, to June 30, 1919; hon. disch. from U. S. A., July 24, 1919. Awarded D. S. M. by President of U. S. for war service Apr. 1920. Author: The Real College, 1909. Home: Minneapolis, Minn. Died June 28, 1927. The Centennial Edition of the Miami University Catalog, published while Dr. Benton was president, included additional information, notably: Member of Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Kappa Alpha, American Geographical Society, and American Historical Society. President, Ohio College Ass'n. 1904, Ohio Conf. of College Deans and Presidents, 1906. Banton's name was originally attached to a building constructed in 1908 to house the administrative offices and an auditorium. In 1969 a building designed primarily for use by the Department of Psychology was given the name Benton Hall and the older structure renamed Hall Auditorium.

    Billings Hall

    John Shaw Billings 1839-1913

    In 1951, a sub-committee of the Adminstrative Council appointed to recommend names for buildings made the following report: "We believe that the natatorium might be appropriately named for one of our most distinguished alumni, John Shaw Billings '57. This would be logical in that Dr. Billings was a medical mad and the other buildings devoted to health activities and health promotion, namely, the Wade MacMillan Hospital and Withrow Court, were named for physicians. Furthermore, Dr. Billings was a military man for a great many years, and this provides an added reason in light of the source for funds used for this building." The natatorium had been built with funds paid to the university by the federal government in connection with its World War II Navy contracts. There are several biographies of Dr. Billings extant. The following appears in Who Was Who 1897-1942: BILLINGS, John Shaw, surgeon, librarian; b. Zwitzerland Co., Ind. Apr. 12, 1839; s. James and Abbie (Shaw) B; A. B., Miami U., 1857, A. M., 1860; N. D., Med. Coll. of Ohio, 1860; (LL.D., U. of Edinburgh, 1884, Harvard, 1886, Buda-Pesth, 1896, Yale, 1901, Johns Hopkins, 1902; M. D., Munich, 1889, Dublin, 1892; D. C. L., Oxford, 1889); m. Kate M. Stevens, Sept. 3, 1862. Demonstrator anatomy, Med. Coll. of Ohio, 1860-61; served in U. S. A., as asst. surgeon, Apr. 16, 1862; maj. surgeon, Dec. 2, 1876; lt. col. deputy surgeon gen., June 6, 1894; bvtd. capt., maj. and lt. col., Mar. 13, 1865, "for faithful and meritorius services during the war"; in hosp. service during Civil War; later med. insp. Army of the Potomac, in charge of library of surgeon-general's office until his appmt., Dec. 28, 1883, as curator Med. Mus. and Library; retired Oct. 1, 1895. In charge vital statistics 10th Census, vital and social statistics, 11th Census. Prof. hygiene, U. of Pa., 1891, and dir., 1893-96; dir. N. Y. Pub. Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden foundations, 1896--, chmn. db. Carnegie Instn., 1905--. Fellow Am. Acad. Arts and Sciences; pres. A. L. A., 1901-02. Author: Principles of Ventilation and Heating, 1886; Index Catalog of the Library of the Surgeon-General's Office U. S. A. (16 vols.), 1880-1894; National Medical Dictionary (2 vols.), 1889. Home: New York. Died March 11, 1913. In 1895 Dr. Billings delivered the commencement address at his Alma Mater.

    Bishop Hall

    Robert Hamilton Bishop 1777-1855

    The name of Robert Hamilton Bishop, first president of the University 1824-1841, was attached to Miami's second women's residence hall when it was constructed in 1911-12. Until 1923 portions of Bishop Hall were also used as a hospital, with the whole building used for this purpose during the influenza epidemic of 1918. The vita of Dr. Bishop, as published in the Centennial Edition of the Miami University Catalogue, reads as follows: A. B. Univ. of Edinburg 1798, D. D. Studied theology with Prof. Lawson at Selkirk, Scotland, 1798-1802. Licensed by Pres. of Perth, (A. Burg) Scotland, June 28, 1802. Sailed with Dr. J. M. Mason to America, Sept., 1802. Pastor of Associate Ref'd. Presb. churches at Ebenezer and New Providence, Ky., 1803-14. Prof. in Transylvania Univ., Lexington, Ky., 1803-24. Editor of "Evangelical Record and Western Review," 1811-13. Joined the Presb. church, Oct. 1819. Pastor of McCord church, Lexington, Ky., 1819-23. President and Prof. Logic and Moral Philosophy and History in Miami Univ., 1824-41. Inaugurated March 30, 1825. Continued as Prof. of History and Political Science in Miami, 1841-45. President Farmer's Coll., 1845-55. Re-organized Presb. church in Oxford and Pastor, 1825-31. Author of "A volume of Sermons," 1808; "Memoirs of David Rice", or "An Outline of the History of the Christian Church in the State of Kentucky," 1824; "Elements of Logic," 1833; "Sketches of the Philosophy of the Bible," 1833; "Elements of the Science of Government," 1839; "The Western Peacemaker," 1839 and numerous special sermons and addresses. Father of Rev. George B., '28, Prof. Robert H., Jr., '31, Prof. Ebenezer E., '33, and Rev. John N., '41. Born in the parish of Whittburn, Linlithgowshire, Scotland, July 26, 1711. Died, April 29th, 1855. Dr. Bishop, and his wife as well, were buried on the grounds of Farmer's College in Cincinnati. On June 20, 1959, when the burial site was to be excavated for the construction of a new high school, they were reburied in a grave near the formal gardens of Miami University.

    Boyd Hall

    William Waddell Boyd 1862 - 1944

    Shortly after the close of World War II the Board of Trustees, at the urging of President Philip E. Henderson, voted to build a science building to be located north of Alumnae Hall. Its library, which was furnished by citizens of Oxford, was named the Oxford Room, and one of the laboratory rooms has been designated as the Kresge Room. Dedicated in 1947 its name was changed to Boyd Hall in 1963 as a memorial to a former president who had well served Western College for seventeen years. Volume II of Who Was Who in America carries the following biography of Dr. Boyd: BOYD, William Waddell, college pres; b. Allegheny, Pa., Mar. 8, 1862; s. Joseph Reed and Martha J. (McGonagle) B.; student Muskingum Coll., New Concord, Ohio, 1 yr.; A. B., Marietta Coll., 1884, Ped. D., 1911; LL. D., Miami U., 1933; studied in Europe 9 summers; m. Mary A. Gates, Sept. 1, 1887; children - Randolph King (dec.), Marion Margaret (Mrs. Walter Havighurst). Teacher pub. schs., Cambridge, O., 1884-85; teacher Crawfis Inst., Lancaster, 1885-90; prin. high sch., Marietta, 190-91; supt. schs., Marietta, 1891-98, Painesville, 1893-1902; high sch. insp., Ohio State U., 1902-07; dean Coll. of Edn., same, 1907-14; Pres. Western Coll. for Women, Oxford, O., 1914-31, now emeritus. Mem. Ohio State Bd. Sch. Examiners, 1893-1903; trustee Ohio Sunday Sch. Assn., Marietta Coll.; coll. counsellor Ohio Dept. of Edn. Mem. N. E. A., Ohio State Teachers Assn., North Central Assn. Colls. and Secondary Schs., Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Sigma Phi. Pres. North Central Assn., 1925, Ohio Coll. Assn., 1923. Republican. Presbyterian; vice-moderator Gen. Assembly of Presbyn. Ch., 1920. Clubs: Cincinnati Business Men's; Cincinnati Schoolmasters' (Columbus). Author: The Government and Civil Institutions of Ohio, 1906. Trustee Western Reserve Acad., Hudson, O. Cruise travel lecturer. Home: 1170 E. Broad St., Columbus, O. Died Feb. 2, 1944. Although this biography merely mentions Dr. Boyd's tenure as the President of Western College his accomplishments were outstanding. During his administration Western College flourished. Its enrollment, physical plant, endowment, faculty composition, and national reputation reached new highs.

    Brandon Hall

    Edgar Ewing Brandon 1865-1957

    Brandon Hall is named for Dean Brandon whose thirty-two years of service to Miami University covered the years from 1898 to 1930. At his retirement the Editor of the Alumni News Letter wrote: "We know of no better tribute to Dr. Brandon than the University itself, and the thousands of alumni whom he influenced in scholarship, learning, and character. Mere words of appreciation and praise, even though dictated by the eloquence of a Webster, could not equal the monument which Dr. Brandon has done so much to raise. To all comes the regret that one so much a part of Miami cannot go on forever, that there must be an end to active service. For a third of a century Dr. Brandon has come in direct personal contact with a great majority of our living alumni. With each he has left something of his sterling character and his scholarship, perpetual forces carrying on for the man who loved Miami, and gave all the years of his active life to her. Who was Who in America, Vol. III, provides the following vita: Brandon, Edgar Ewing, educator; born York Springs, Pa., Aug. 9, 1865; s. John Calvin and Mary Braiding (Ewing) B.; A. B., U. of Mich., 188; A. M., U. of Mo., 1897; studied U. of Paris, 1893-94, and 1901-02, Docteur d'Universite, 1904; LL. D., Miami U., 1930; m. Charlotte Taylor, June 11, 1901; m. 2d., Grace Glasgow, Aug. 14, 1929. Latin master, Carthage, Mo., 1889-93, instr. in French, U. of Mich., 1895-96 and 1897-98, fellow in Romance langs., U. of Mo., 1896-97; prof, Romance langs., Miami U., Oxford, O., 1898-31, v. p. 1908-31, dean 1912-31, acting pres., 1909-10, 1927-28, now emeritus. Dir. Foyer du Soldat, France, 1918-1919. Spl. comr. Pan-Am Union to visit and report on instns. of higher learning in Latin America, 1911-12. Del. to 2nd Pan-Am. Scientific Congress, 1915. Member Modern Lang. Assn. of America, Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Tau (pres. 1920-23). Mason. Republican. Presbyterian. Author: Robert Estienne et le doctionnaire francaise au XVI Siecle, 1904; Latin American Universities, 1912; Precis d'histoire des Etas Unis, 1919 (Trans. English 1919); A Pilgrimage of Liberty, 1944; Lafayette, Guest of the National, Vol. I, 1950, Vol. II, 1954, III, 1957. Editor: La Tulipe Noire, 1899; Monte Cristo, 1900; Series Lessons for Beginners in French, 1920. Joint editor La Petite ville, 1925; Henri III et sa cour, 1926; Turgaret, 1927. Home 315 E. Church St., Oxford, Ohio. Died June 8, 1957; buried Oxford Cemetery. At the time Brandon (and McFarland) Halls were planned it was noted that they were dormitories rather than residence halls. In view of Dean Brandon's promotion of the fraternity system, his service to Phi Kappa Tau fraternity, and his purchase of land for building fraternity houses, the location and function of Brandon Hall are both uniquely appropriate.

    Clawson Hall

    Edith Clawson 1878-1944

    Shortly after the end of World War II the trustees of Western College began plans for a science building and an additional dormitory. The alumnae adopted the dormitory as their project, and contributed generously. The total was greatly increased by a gift received in the will of Edith Clawson, and the new dormitory was named for her. Miss Edith Clawson was born in Hamilton, Ohio on December 7, 1878. She was the daughter of Linus P. and Rosa (Hughes) Clawson. Mr. Clawson was a co-founder of the Black and Clawson Co. Miss Clawson received an A. B. degree from Western College in the class of 1900. A year later she did graduate work at the University of Chicago and received a second A. b. degree. She attended the University of Berlin in 1903-05. While pursuing additional graduate study at the University of Chicago 1905-07 she was a teacher in the high school department of the School of Education. She also traveled in Europe and the Orient. After 1908 she was active in Hamilton, Ohio serving as president of the Women's Club and as a member of other organizations including the First Methodist Church. In 1913 she was an active participant in flood relief work and was assistant to the treasurer of the American Red Cross. From 1917 to 1920 she was general secretary and acting treasurer of the Hamilton Chapter of the American Red Cross. She moved to Los Angeles, California in the early twenties where she became Chairman of the Mission Department of the Hollywood Congregational Church. Although now a California resident, she made annual visits to Oxford and Hamilton. In 1933 she had been elected by Western alumnae as their first representative on the Board of Trustees and in 1937 the Board made her a permanent member. Her death occurred in California on October 28, 1944 and, in accord with her wishes, she was cremated and her ashes returned to Hamilton for burial. In 1962 a substantial addition in the form of a dining room was added to the dormitory. Built largely with funds contributed by an alumna, Bess Mason Alexander, this portion of Edith Clawson Hall was named the Alexander Dining Room.

    Climer Hall

    Fred Watson Climer Irene White Climer 1895-

    In 1966 when the alumni center was under construction, Mr. and Mr. Fred W. Climer became joint donors of the cost of a nine-suite guest facility, which became an addition to the main building. This wing has provided overnight accomodations for hundreds of guests of Miami University since its completion in 1968. Both Mr. and Mrs. Climer were graduated from Miami in 1917 with Bachelor of Arts degrees. As undergraduate students they were exceptionally active. Fred Climer was a member of Delta Tau Delta social fraternity and served as editor of the Miami Student in both his junior and senior years. He was also in the band, orchestra, glee club, and chapel choir; was an officer in the Commercial Club and the Ohio College Press Association; won a student assistantship in economics, and was elected to Sigma Delta Chi, Tau Kappa Alpha, and Grail and Red Cowl. Despite these diverse demands on his time he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Irene White, who came to Miami from New Richmond, Ohio, was a member of Chi Omega and participated in the Liberal Arts Club, the Classical Club, class basketball and hockey teams, and was on the staff of the Miami Student. She served as president of the Pan-Hellenic Council and as vice president of the Women's Athletic Board. The Climers were married on January 23, 1920. They had one son, Dan W., who was killed in the Battle of the Bulge in World War II. Mr. Climer was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, November 9, 1895 but entered Miami from Winchester, Indiana. He joined the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. upon graduation, spent approximately a year in the World War I army including overseas duty in the 84th division as a second lieutenant, and returned to Akron in 1919 to move up rapidly in Goodyear. He became employment manager in 1921 and personnel manager in 1923. He was sent to Argentina in 1930 to supervise construction of a thousand-times-a-day plant; he continued as its general superintendent until 1934, when he returned to personnel work in Akron. He became director of world-wide Goodyear factory and sales personnel in 1938, assistant to the president in 1943, vice president in charge of industrial relations in 1947; the title later was changed to vice president for labor relations. While in Akron Mr. Climer was a trustee of the YMCA, Peoples Hospital, Summit County Tuberculosis Association, and various clubs; member of the executive committee of the YMCA and United Foundation, and 1952 Campaign manager for United Foundation. Goodyear loaned him to the War Production Board for two years of World War II. He was a director of the New Richmond National Bank, 1957-68. Mr. Climer was a member of Miami's Board of Trustees 1953-68. He served as treasurer of the board from 1956-59 and vice chairman 1959-62. Since retiring from Goodyear in 1956 he and Mrs. Climer have maintained homes in New Richmond, Ohio and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. His Alma Mater conferred the Doctor of Laws degree on him in 1973.

    Foster J. Cole Service Building

    Foster J. Cole 1901-1968

    In 1956 the General Assembly of the State of Ohio appropriated $400,000 for the construction of a Maintenance and Stores Building. The site chosen was east of Cook Field in an area used by the grounds department as a nursery. In 1969 a recommendation of the Committee on Naming Buildings that this one-story structure be designated the Foster J. Cole Maintenance Building was approved by the Board of Trustees. In 1973, in recognition of the expanded use of the area and its designation on the University map as the Foster J. Cole Service Building, it was recommended and approved that the latter name receive official sanction. Foster J. Cole was born in Wharton, in Wyandot County near Upper Sandusky, July 22, 1901. He spent his boyhood in Hamilton, where his father was a hardware merchant; was graduated from the old Hamilton High School in 1920, and received the Bachelor of Arts degree was Miami in 1924. Shortly after graduation he joined the business staff of Miami and served his Alma Mater continuously until his retirement in 1965. He held the title of purchasing agent or Director of Purchases for over 30 years and became business manager in 1954 when illness handicapped W. P. Roudebush, whose title was vice president and treasurer. In this capacity he was in charge of all construction, physical plant operation and maintenance, procurement, personnel and service operations, and auxiliary enterprises which included the residence hall system, airport, and University Center. In addition to 41 years of service to Miami University, Mr. Cole served a term as president of the National Association of Educational Buyers and as a member of the board of directors of the Educational and Institutional Cooperative Service. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the Oxford National Bank prior to its becoming a branch bank, and was a trustee of the Beta Theta Pi Foundation, which was set up to finance the Centenary and the construction of the Beta Theta Pi Campanile on the campus. In later years he devoted a great deal of time and effort to the men of the Honor Camp, which the State correctional system had established at Hueston Woods State Park. Mr. Cole was married on August 17, 1927 to Miss Elizabeth Nitchie, who had been an instructor in the Department of Women's Physical Education for two years. They were divorced many years later and there were no children. Mr. Cole died at his Oxford home on June 22, 1968 of an apparent heart attack.

    Collins Hall

    Joel Collins 1772-1860

    Collins Hall was first occupied in January, 1953 by freshmen who had been living in the Lodges, temporary men's housing located in the veteran's area. An addition to Collins Hall was completed in 1956. Joel Collins was born in Halifax County, Virginia, September 16, 1772. In 1779 his family moved to Kentucky and by the time Joel was 18 years old he was an Indian fighter having learned some of his lessons from Daniel Boone. From 1791 to 1797 he was a various times a sergeant, lieutenant, and captain in the Kentucky militia and United States army. He saw service at Fort Hamilton and Fort Greenville in Ohio. In 1797 he became a judge in Lincoln County, Kentucky. He married Elizabeth Peeler whose brother had settled on Four Mile Creek near Oxford. In 1806 the family moved to this area. He cleared land for farming, established a powder mill, and when the township was organized Collins was elected the first justice of the peace. He surveyed much of the land in and near Oxford. In 1809 he led a committee appointed to locate Miami University on "Education Hill" - its present location. Captain Collins - he was so appointed in the standing army of the United States - served Miami University in several capacities. He was superintendent of grounds and college buildings from 1815 to 1827 and was secretary of the board of trustees from 1822 to 1855. In 1817 he was elected to the General Assembly of the State of Ohio and in 1821 his vote prevented the removal of Miami University to Cincinnati. Subsequently he was able to prevent several other efforts to move the University out of Oxford. Collins has been called an Indian fighter, farmer, judge, statesmen, surveyor, and military man. In addition, there is no doubt but that he was a loyal supporter of Miami University. He died in Oxford on November 16, 1860.

    Cook Place

    R(obert) Harvey Cook 1870-1949

    Cook Place was built as a home for Dr. R. Harvey Cook who, with his father, operated a sanitarium. When the Oxford Retreat (Fisher Hall) was sold to Miami University in 1925 its patients were moved to the Pines, which was adjacent to Cook Place. In 1936 Miami University acquired the remaining Cook properties with the provision that Dr. and Mrs. Cook were to have use of the residence during their lifetimes. The biography of Dr. Cook as it appears in Who Was Who 1943-50 is as follows: COOK, R(obert) Harvey, physician; b. Eaton O., 1870; s. George Frederick and Sallie J. (Pryor) C.; A. B. Miami U., 1891, A. M., 1894; M. D. Med. Coll. of Ohio, 1894; post-grad. work in New York and abroad; m. Besse Orr, Dec. 18, 1895; children--George Harvey, M. O. Specializes in nervous diseases. Became Supt. of Oxford Retreat, a pvt. hosp., 1910, now retired. Mem. A. M. A., Am. Psychol. Assn., Ohio State Med. Soc., Cincinnati Acad. Medicine, Beta Theta Pi. Republican. Presbyterian. Mason (32°). Home: Oxford, O. Died Nov. 24, 1949. In 1951 and continuing until 1970 Cook Place was the official residence for the Provost of Miami University. It then became the Office of Residence Halls.

    Culler Hall

    Joseph Albertus Culler 1858-1937

    Culler Hall, occupied in 1961 by the Departments of Physics and Mathematics, was named for the first Professor of Physics in Miami's history. His biography, as it appears in Who Was Who in America, 1897-1942, reads as follows: CULLER, Joseph Albertus, univ. prof.; b. on farm in Wayne Co., O., Mar. 5, 1858; s. Michael and Barbara C.; A. B., U. of Wooster, 1884, later A. M., Ph. D., 1900; m. Isabella Carnes, 1887. Prin. high schs., Cambridge, O., 1884-85, Kenton, O., 1885-1900; supt. schs., Kenton, O., 1900-01, Bowling Green, O., 1901-03; prof. physics, Miami U., 1903-26, emiritus. Presbyn., Republican. Author: 1st, 2d and 3d Book of Physiology, 1904; First Book in Physics, 1905; High School Book of Physics, 1906; General Physics for Colleges, Mechanics and Heat, 1909; Electricity, Electromagnetic Waves and Sound, 1913; Physics for College Freshmen, 1922. Home: Oxford, O. Died May 18, 1937. Dr. Culler's death was attributed to the cumulative effects of burns suffered in connection with his research activities conducted both before ad after his retirement. His major interest centered around radium.

    Dennison Hall

    William Dennison 1815-1882

    Although Dennison Hall is the center building of a residence hall complex including Collins and McBride Halls, it was the last to be constructed. The main building was completed in 1958 and the dining room added in 1959. Dedication ceremonies were held in June, 1961. Biographies of William Dennison appear in the Centennial Edition of the Miami University Alumni Catalogue; Who was Who in America, Historical Volume 1607-1896; the Dictionary of American Biography, Volume III; and the National Cyclopaedia of American Biography. The sketch appearing in the Alumni Catalog identifies this alumnus as a member of Alpha Delta Phi and reads as follows: A. B., 1935, A. M., 1844. Admitted to the bar, Cincinnati, 1840. Practiced law at Columbus, 1840-48, 1866-82. State Senator of Ohio, 1848-50. Presidential Elector, 1852 and 1856, Delegate to Republican Presidential Conventions, 1856, 1864 and 1880. Chairman of the Convention of 1864. Governor of Ohio, 1860-64. Appointed by President Lincoln U. S. Postmaster-General, 1864. Resigned, 1866. President Columbus Exchange Bank. President of Columbus & Xenia R. R. Contributed largely of his means to Dennison Coll., Granville, O. Delivered address before Miami Univ. Alumni Association, 1851. Born, Cincinnati, O., Nov. 23, 1815. Died, June 15, 1882. Other facts of interest are that Governor Dennison married the daughter of William Neil of Columbus shortly after being admitted to the bar, and that, although best known as a politician, he acquired a considerable fortune as a businessman. He was a pioneer promotor of railroads including the Hocking Valley as well as the Columbus & Xenia line that he served as president. An enterprise of another type in which he was influential in establishing was the Columbus Rolling Mills.

    Dodds Hall

    Ozro J. Dodds 1840-1882

    The following information was taken from the program for the dedication of the buildings facing the South Quadrangle of the South Campus of Miami University on September 16, 1961: Ozro Jennison Dodds, class of 1861, as a senior organized and led the Miami Rifles, first unit to enter the Union Army from the campus. After the war he became a lawyer, practicing in Cincinnati. He was a member of the Ohio House of Representatives, 1872-74, and a trustee of Miami University, 1875-1882. A more complete biography appears in Who was Who, Historical Volume, 16-7-1896. In this volume the name Ozro John Dodds is used. Dodds, Ozro John, congressman, lawyer; b. Cincinnati, Mar. 22, 1940; attended Miami U., Oxford, O., 4 years, received degree after Civil War; attended Cincinnati Law Sch. Organized Capt. Dodds' Univ. Co. during Civil War, enlisted as capt. Co. B., 20th Ohio Volunteer Regt., 1861; served as capt. Co. F, 81st Ohio Volunteer Inf., and acting asst. q. m., 1861-63; promoted 1t. col. 1st Ala. Union Cavalry, 1863; admitted to bar, 1866, began practice of law, Cincinnati; mem. Ohio Ho. of Reps., 1870-71; mem. U. S. Ho. of Reps. (Democrat, filled vacancy) from Ohio, 42nd Congress, Oct. 8, 1872-73. Died Columbus, O., Apr. 18, 1882; buried Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati. The Miami University Alumni Catalogue, Centennial Edition, uses the middle name Jenison rather than John. It also notes that he delivered an address before the Alumni Association of Miami University in 1870 and was the orator at the reunion of the Army of the Tennessee, 1881.

    Dorsey Hall

    James Maxwell Dorsey 1776-1857

    The following information was taken from The Post & Times-Star, Cincinnati, Thursday, March 30, 1961. Miami University has begun construction of Dorsey Hall, which will house 243 women in Miami's East Campus. Bids on the project total $1,034,074. It is part of a housing expansion program for which Miami has borrowed $9,100,000. The building is named for James Maxwell Dorsey (1776-1857), who established and taught the first school on the University grounds here, supervised construction of Miami's first building and was first treasurer of the University. The Centennial Edition of the Miami University Catalogue devotes a page to the Select School and Mr. Dorsey that appears as follows: MIAMI UNIVERSITY Select School 1811-1818 Principal James Maxwell Dorsey, Teacher, Piqua, O.

    Teacher Baltimore, Md. for several years prior to 1809. Removed to Cincinnati 1809. Principal of a "Select School," conducted in a building erected for the purpose by the University Trustees on the Campus of Miami Univ., Oxford, O., 1811-1818. Supt. of Construction during erection of college buildings of Miami Univ., 1818-24. Treasurer of Miami Univ., 1824-27. An organizer of the Society of "Rational Brethren of Oxford," 1816. Removed to New Harmony, Ind., and was associated with Robert Dale Owen, 1830-33. Resided Greenville, O., 1833-45; Piqua, O., 1845-57. Born, Baltimore county, Md., 1776. Died, Piqua, O., 1857. The present location of Dorsey Hall, facing Cook Field, was not the original site for this building when it was in the planning stage. It was supposed to face the drive leading to Fisher Hall but this location would have necessitated the removal of a magnificent bald cypress tree. The vigorous protest of the University's superintendent of grounds was heeded and the tree still stands.

    Edwards House

    Ray Lee Edwards 1885 - 1969

    The Edwards House at 22 North Tallawanda was built in 1923 and acquired by Dr. Edwards when he joined the faculty of Miami University in 1926. He and his family lived here for more than twenty years but he then sold the house to the Delta Chi Fraternity and built a new home on Chestnut Street. In 1971 the University purchased the Edwards House and it served as the Speech and Hearing Clinic until the construction of Bachelor Hall. Currently the Offices of Student Aid occupy the building. The biography of Dr. Edwards as it appears in Who's Who in America, Vol. 31, 1960-61, covers his career at Miami. EDWARDS, Ray Lee, prof. physics; b. Forest Grove, Ore., Nov. 12, 1885; s. Darius Lyman and Mary Imogene (Houghton) E; A. B., Oberlin Coll., 1908; B. S., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1909; A. M., Ohio State Univ., 1911; Ph. D., University of Iowa, 1925; m. Winifred Julia Knight, Aug. 23, 1911; children--Jean Allice (Mrs. Mason Quebedaux), Lawrence Knight, Harold Houghton. Science teacher, 1908-10; prof. physics, Park Coll., Parksville, Mo., 1911-26; asst. instr. physics, U. of Chicago, summers 1921-23; instr. physics, U. of Ia., 1924-25; prof. and chmn. dept. physics, Miami U., Oxford, O., 1925-56, emeritus 1956--; visiting prof Ohio State U., summer 1942, U. of Illinois, summer 1951, Colo. U., 1956-57, Beloit College, 1957-59, vis. lecturer, Duke Univ., 1959--. Fellow Ohio Acad. of Science (vice president 1933, 1943, and 1948); mem. Am. Phys. Soc., Am. Assn. Physics Teachers, A. A. A. S., Am. Assn. Univ. Profs., Sigma Xi, Gamma Alpha. Presbyterian. Associate editor Am. Jour. of Physics, 1945-47. Has pub. original research in mechanics, liquid viscosities, and magnetism; articles on teaching of physics, 1945. Home: 414 E. Chesnut St., Oxford, Ohio; also 1935 Crest Rd., Beloit, Wis. After two years at Duke Dr. Edwards taught one year at Trinity College in San Antonio, Texas and two years at Harvey Mudd (Professor Emeritus) before retiring a second time. During this long teaching career he sent more students to MIT and Cal. Teach. than any other teacher in the world. He died April 14, 1969 in Claremont, California.

    Elliott Hall

    Charles Elliott 1815-1892

    The oldest building on the campus, Elliott Hall was completed in 1829. It was remodeled on various occasions and completely renovated in 1937. Originally designated as Washington & Clinton Hall, it was commonly called the Northeast Building or North Dorm. Between 1873 and 1885 when Miami was closed it was named Washington Hall but the term North Dorm persisted. In 1912 the building was divided into two parts and the north end was called Johnson Hall and the south end Elliott Hall thus honoring two distinguished former faculty members. After the remodeling in 1937 the entire building was called Elliott Hall. Dr. Elliott is identified in the Centennial Edition of the Miami University Alumni Catalogue as a minister from Easton, Pa., and a member of Alpha Delta Phi and Phi Delta Theta. The reference to Phi Delta Theta is particularly appropriate as a plaque on the outside west wall of Elliott Hall marks the room where the fraternity was founded in 1848. Additional biographical information from the catalogue is as follows: A. B., Lafayette, Coll., 1840. A. M. D. D., Ohio Univ., 1861. LL. D., Hanover Coll., 1891. B. D., Princeton Theol. Sem., 1841. Ordained Evangelist, Presbytery of Oxford, April, 1858. Stated Supply, College Corner, O., 1861-63. Principal Academy, Xenia, O., 1843-45; Lane Seminary, 1845-47. Prof. Belles-lettres, Univ. Pittsburg, 1847-49. Prof. of Greek Language and Literature and of Logic, Miami Univ., 1849-63. Prof. of Biblical Literature, and Exegesis, McCormick Theol. Sem., Chicago, Ill. 1863-82. Prof. of Hebrew, Lafayette Coll., Easton, Pa., 1882-92. Author of "The Sabbath," 1866; part of "Lange's Commentary on the Bible," 1874; "Inspiration of the Scriptures," 1877; "Biblical Hermeneutics," 1879; "Mosaic Authorship of Pentateuch," 1884; Member American Oriental Society; Philosophical Society of Great Britain; Victoria Institute, London; American Society of Biblical Literature. Born, Castleton, Scotland, March 18, 1815. Died, February 15, 1892.

    Emerson Hall

    Bertha Metcalf Emerson 1887-1973

    On June 7, 1968 the Board of Trustees took action naming Residence Hall #16 in honor of Bertha Metcalf Emerson who, for twenty-two years shared the supervision of Miami women with Dean Hamilton and then for four years before she, too, retired, headed women's affairs. A "proper Bostonian," Dean Emerson was loyal and respected by countless students. As head of Wells Hall for twenty years she had close personal contact with hundreds of upperclass girls and their swains as well. A biography of Miss Emerson would read as follows: b. Waltham, Mass., June 26, 1887. Simmons College 1906-1910, B. S., 1910. Radcliffe College 1918-1922, A. M., 1923. Sept.-Nov. 1910, Assistant to Editor of Massachusetts Historical Society; 1910-1913, Secretary in Office of the President, Harvard University; 1913-1922, Instructor in Secretarial Department of Simmons College; 1923 Feb.-June, Secretary in Alumni Office of Carleton College; with Miami Univ. from 1923 to 1949 as Asst. Dean of Women and Asst. Prof. of Secretarial Studies, 1923-40, Head of Wells Hall, 1923-43, Acting Dean of Women 1926-27, 1939-40, and 1945-46, Assoc. Prof. of Sec. Stud., 1940-49, Associate Director of Student Affairs, 1946-49. Retired as Emeritus Professor in 1949 to Pemaquid Point, Maine. Congregational. Died in Damariscotta, Maine, January 19, 1973. The Bertha M. Emerson Hall was dedicated on Nov. 1, 1969 and it was appropriate that the key was turned over to President Shriver by the then only woman member of the Board of Trustees, Lucile Crowell Cooks. On the same day the A. K. Morris Hall was dedicated. For a period of twenty-three years these two individuals were co-workers concerned with student affairs.

    Finkelman Auditorium

    Dave Finkelman 1903 - 1964

    Shortly after the sudden death of Dave Finkelman on December 28, 1964 his widow indicated to Mr. Logan T. Johnston, Chairman of the campaign to raise funds for the Middletown campus of Miami University, that she was interested in creating a memorial for her husband. Officials of Miami indicated the desirability of an auditorium. Construction was started in 1967 and the building was dedicated in 1969. Dave Finkelman's biography as it appeared in the 1965 edition of Who's Who in World Jewry reads as follows: FINKELMAN, Dave, U. S., business executive: b. Koroshov, Russia, Sept. 2, 1903; s. Harry and Lena (Katlarsky); in U. S. since 1912; m. Gladys Fisher, Dec. 23, 1928. Owner, real estate and insurance firm, since 1923; pres. and dir., Citizen's Bldg. and Loan Assn., 1959. Chmn. Middletown UJA campaigns; bd member: YMCA; Salvation Army; Middletown Hospital; member: Middletown Real Estate Bd; Temple Israel, Dayton, O,; E'nai B'rith. Club, Rotary, bd member, 1959. Home: 2800 Superior Ave., Middletown, Ohio. Office: 1213 Central Ave., Middletown, Ohio. The above biography does not mention that Mr. Finkelman was a generous contributor to many worthwhile projects and was considered to be an outstanding civic leader in Middletown.

    Fisher Hall

    Elam Fisher 1846-1923

    Any account of Fisher Hall is likely to be a lengthy description of the various uses made of this historic building by several owners. Miami University acquired it in March, 1926 from Dr. R. Harvey Cook who had been using it as a sanitarium. It was remodeled for dormitory use and occupied in September, 1927 by freshmen. At that time it was named for Judge Elam Fisher, a trustee of Miami for 36 years. Shortly after his death the following obituary appeared in the August, 1923 Miami University Alumni News Letter: Judge Elam Fisher died at this home in Eaton, Ohio on Thursday, May 10, 1923. He received the degree Bachelor of Arts at Miami in 1870 and the Master of Arts degree in 1886. In 1872 he was given the degree of LL.B. from the University of Michigan, and in 1917 the degree LL.D. from Ohio University. On May 9, 1872 at Evansville, Indiana, he was married to Miss Maria Still, who survives him. The same year he began the practice of law in his home town, Eaton. He was counsel for the C. H, and D. Railroad, director and counsel of the Eaton National Bank, President of the Eaton Lighting Company, and director and treasurer of the Eaton Telephone Company, member of the Ohio House of Representatives 1891-1894, member of the Torrens Land Commission 1894-96, and judge of the court of common please, second judicial district of Ohio, for eighteen years. Judge Fisher was a member of Company D, 156th O. V. I. in the Civil War and the G. A. R. in later years. He served faithfully as a trustee of Miami University for 36 years since 1887. His educational work also included faithful duty as trustee of Oxford for Women, being chosen to that duty in 1908. He was a member of the State Bar Association, Preble County Bar Association, and its president in 1910 and 1911, member of the Ohio Electric Light Association. He was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity, Methodist Church, and a thirty-second degree Mason. The above obituary fails to state that Elam Fisher was born on July 26, 1846.

    Flower Hall

    Olive Flower 1875-1964

    The most northerly of all student residences, Flower Hall was occupied in September, 1966 and dedicated with appropriate ceremonies on April 15, 1967. Mill Olive Flower, for whom the building was named, was born in Proctorville, Ohio, August 17, 1875. She received an A. P. degree from Oxford College in 1897 and went on to Smith College to earn an additional A. B. degree in 1901. She then became a chemistry teacher at Oxford College and continued to teach through 1918. From 1906 to 1928 she was also the registrar and from 1919 to 1928 served s the dean of Oxford College. After the merger with Miami University in 1928 she became assistant registrar at Miami until she retired in 1946. Miss Flower was the author of History of Oxford College for Women published in 1948 and regularly prepared Oxford College notes for the Miami Alumnus. Her efforts were instrumental in perpetuating the identity of Oxford College alumnae while, at the same time, obtaining from them their loyalty to Miami University. In 1947 the Bishop Medal was presented to her in recognition of her scholarship and service. In 1952 Miami gave her name to the chapel in the Oxford College Building, where she had lived for many years. Although she suffered a loss of hearing in her later years, Miss Flower was always cheerful and friendly. She died December 29, 1964 at the Hamilton (Ohio) Community Home.

    Irvin Hall

    Horace A. Irvin 1855-1925

    Irvin Hall was designed as the perfect recitation building with faculty offices on the inside corridor and classrooms on the outside. The north and central sections were built in 1925 and the south wing was completed in 1928. The building was named for Horace A. Irvin who was chairman of the building committee of the Board of Trustees at the time of his death in 1925. He had been a valued member of the board since 1896 and had had a large responsibility for every building on the campus in 1925 with the exception of part of what was then called Old Main and the two old dormitories. Mr. Irvin was born February 17, 1855 and attended Miami University for two years, 1871 and 1872. He is officially listed as ex '74 as the University closed its doors in 1873. In 1900 the University awarded him the A. M. degree. After serving as secretary for several years of Lowe Brothers Co., paint manufacturers, in Dayton he founded and became president of the Irvin, Jewell and Vinson Co., makers of Anchor paints and colors. In addition to business activities he was a trustee of the Westminster Presbyterian Church, a director of the Merchants National Bank, a thirty-third degree Mason, and a member of Alpha Delta Phi. He gave much time and interest to philanthropic and civic enterprises. Mr. Irvin died on May 13, 1925.

    Gardner House

    Colin Gardner, Jr. 1886-1968

    The Gardner House, called Colonial Hall when it was built in 1892 by Colin Gardner, Sr., is located in the City of Middletown approximately three miles from the Miami University - Middletown campus. I was donated to the University by Colin Gardner, Jr. Colin Gardner, Jr. was born in Middletown on June 30, 1886. The son of Colin Gardner, Sr. and Elizabeth Tytus Gardner, he was one of three boys born to this couple. After attending the University of Cincinnati for a year he entered the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University and received a Bachelor of Science Degree in 1909. On April 6, 1911 he married Ethel Ames and two sons and two daughters were born to this union. In 1923 Mr. Gardner married a second time to a Miss Elinor Vandergrift and one son was born to this couple. After graduation from Yale Mr. Gardner joined the Colin Gardner Paper Co. as a timekeeper. Subsequently he became a treasurer, vice president for sales, and in 1950 was named executive vice president. From 1954 to 1957 he served as president of the company at which time it merged with the Diamond Match Co. to become the Diamond Gardner Co. He then served as president of the Gardner Division and remained in this capacity when a merger with the United States Printing & Lithographing Co. resulted in a name change to the Diamond National Corporation. Mr. Gardner was active in the Middletown community as a director of the First National Bank, Chairman of the American Red Cross, president of the Brown's Run Country Club, and a board member of the I. M. C. A. He was a charter member of the board of trustees of the Middletown Hospital and became its treasurer. On the national scene he was president of the Folding Box Association of America, 1938-39, and was a member of the Office of Price Stabilization Committee of the U. S. boxboard industry. He was also a member of the National Production Authority and a director of the Boxboard Research and Development Association. He died July 25, 1968 at the age of 82.

    Gardner-Harvey Library

    Colin Gardner, Sr. 1838-1919 George Henry Harvey 1866-1948

    The campus of Miami University - Middletown originally consisted of two buildings - Johnston Hall and the Gardner-Harvey Library. The latter building had not been originally planned but was made possible by a substantial gift from the Gardner-Harvey Foundation. This Foundation had been established to honor two men who were outstanding leaders in the papermaking industry. Colin Gardner

    A condensed biography of Colin Gardner, Sr. might read as follows: Born in Carthage (Cincinnati), Ohio November 7, 1938 the son of James Brewster and Elizabeth (Ludlow) Gardner. Married Elizabeth Tytus Dec. 6, 1870 and this union produced three sons, Edwart T., Colin, Jr., and Robert Brewster. Partner in dry goods firm of Geo. W. Jones & Co., Cincinnati, 1857-1870. Moved to Middletown and from 1872 to 1900 served the Tytus Paper Co. as vice-president and president although by 1900 the name had been changed to the Tytus-Gardner Paper and Manufacturing Co. In 1900 he joined his son Edward and George H. Harvey to form a new company that in 1906 became the Gardner-Harvey Paper Co. In 1917 he organized still another company - the Gardner Paper Board Co. He served the first two companies as president and then in 1917 became chairman of the board of all three. A lifelong Baptist he was a layman in his church. He served briefly in the Civil War. He devoted much attention to community affairs and contributed generously to charitable causes. In 1919 he was taken seriously ill in Palm Beach, Florida and returned to his permanent home "Colonial Hill" in Middletown where he died on March 7, 1919, leaving a nationwide reputation in the papermaking industry. George H. Harvey

    A brief biography of George Henry Harvey includes the following details: Born in Wardsworth, England, March 11, 1866; son of Thomas Harvey and Frances (Roberta) Harvey. Married Elisa Jane Ross of West Springfield, Massachusetts on May 5, 1891 and they were the parents of one son, Arthur Ross Harvey. In 1872 the family had moved to the United States and young George worked in several paper making mills in the east. In 1896 he came to Middletown and joined Colin Gardner, Sr. in the operation of the Tytus-Gardner Paper and Mfg. Co. He became so valuable an employee that he was a full partner when the Gardner-Harvey Paper Co. was formed in 1906. In 1918 when Colin Gardner, Sr. retired from the various companies he headed Mr. Harvey became general manager of all of the organizations. In 1924 when the companies he headed Mr. Harvey became general manager of all of the organizations. In 1924 when the companies joined with the Universal Paper Products Co. he served the new organization as treasurer and production manager. A Methodist, Mr. Harvey was a life member of the I. M. C. A., a founder of the Middletown Hospital, a Mason, and a Republican. A generous contributor to civic, charitable, religious, and educational causes, he remained active until his death on November 30, 1948 in Middletown.

    Gaskill Hall

    David L. Gaskill 1863-1939

    A wing of the present Gaskill Hall was occupied in 1925 at which time it was called the Industrial Arts Building. In 1948-49 the name was changed to the Fred C. Whitcomb Laboratories. Subsequently additions were made to the building in 1951 and again in 1959 at which time the entire structure was named Gaskill Hall. David L. Gaskill was born in 1863 in Troy, Ohio but moved to Greenville in 1890 and began the practice of law there the following year. He was a graduate of Ohio State University. In 1907 he was appointed to the Board of Trustees of Miami University and served 32 years. He was elected president of the board in 1937 and served in this capacity until his death on March 9, 1939. Mr. Gaskill founded the Greenville Electric Light Company and served as its president until 1927 when the company was absorbed. For many years he was an influential member of the Greenville Board of Education and also was elected for a term of office as president of the Ohio State Association and was a thirty-third degree Mason. His obituary published in the May, 1939 Miami University Bulletin stated: "As a member of the Board of Trustees his long experience and large abilities contributed much to the progress and growth of the University. His interest in the institution during his 32 years of service never waned, and until infirmities prevented, he gave unreservedly of his time to his duties on the Board." At the time of his death he was survived by his widow and four children, Helen, ex-'08, Mary Gaskill Prugh, '13, and David, ex-'16.

    Goggin Ice Arena

    Lloyd A(lbert) Goggin

    Construction on a three million dollar ice arena began in 1975 and the facility became available for use November 1, 1976. A formal dedication took place December 10, 1976. The person most responsible for the project, including financing, was Mr. Lloyd A. Goggin, Vice President for Finance and Business Affairs and Treasurer, Miami University. Consequently, it was most appropriate when the Board of Trustees took action on June 15, 1984 naming the facility the Lloyd A. Goggin Ice Arena. Lloyd A. Goggin was born in Randolph, Maine on Nov. 16, 1918, the son of George W. and Susan Lewis Goggin. After graduation from the Gardiner (Maine) high school he worked for the Commonwealth Shoe and Leather Co. in Gardiner for four years. In 1940 he entered the Bentley School of Accounting and Finance but his college career was cut short by military service. Entering the army as a private he was discharged as a Captain having graduated from the Finance OCS at Duke University. He then entered Bowdoin College and this institution conferred the A.B. degree on him in 1951. In 1963 he earned the M.B.A. degree at Miami. His career at Miami began in 1947 when he was named Comptroller. In 1956 he was made Treasurer and in 1966 his title was changed to Vice President for Finance and Business Affairs as well as Treasurer. After thirty-five years of service to Miami he retired in 1982. During his years in Oxford Mr. Goggin gave generously of his time and abilities to many organizations at the local, state, and national levels. He was a director and past president of the Oxford United Appeal, director of the Oxford Chamber of Commerce, director and past president of the McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital, treasurer of the Miami University Pulp and Paper Foundation, and a member of the Kiwanis and Rotary clubs. Miami University recognized his services to the alumni program by awarding him the A. K. Morris Award in 1976 and the City of Oxford named him Citizen of the Years in 1976. Outside of Oxford he served as a member of the Board of Directors of the Citizens Bank in Hamilton, as a member of the Central Ohio River Valley Health Planning Association, Miami Conservancy District (past president), Butler County TB Program, Central Ass'n. of College and University Business Officers (past president), National Association of College and University Business Officers (past president), National Association of College and University Business Officers, Southwest Ohio Regional Computer Center, College Entrance Examination Board, Ohio Student Loan Commission, and was past chairman of the Council on Business Affairs of the Nat'l. Ass'n. of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges. His memberships include Beta Gamma Sigma, Beta Alpha Psi, Phi Kappa Phi, Omicron Delta Kappa and the University Club of Columbus. Married to June Gallant on July 30, 1943 he is the father of four children, Pamela (Mrs. James G. Robinson) '66, Paul '70, Patricia (Mrs. Martin Robles) '71, and Penelope (Mrs. John Forker). In 1975 the students recognized Mr. and Mrs. Goggin by naming them Parents of the Year.

    Hahne Hall

    Ernest Herman Hahne 1890-1952

    Hahne Hall was dedicated on April 15, 1967. It was named after the fifteenth president of Miami University who had died in office almost fifteen years earlier. The biography of Dr. Hahne as it appears in Who Was Who, Volume III, 1951-60, reads as follows: Hahne, Ernest Herman, univ. pres.; b. Walker, Kan., Oct. 20, 1890; e. Herman and Virginia (Kitchen) II.; A. B.,U. of Neb., 1911, LL. B., 1913; A. M., Harvard University, 1914; Ph; Ph D., University of Chicago, 1930; LL. D., Ripon College, 1950; m. Helen Madeline Jess, July 2, 1917; children--Dorothy Joan, Ruth Elizabeth. Asst. in economics, U. of Chicago, 1915-16; chmn. Dept. of Economics and Sociology, Dak. Wesleyan U., Mitchell, S. D., 1916-18; instr. in economics, Northwestern U., 1919-22, asst. prof., 1924-29, assoc. prof. 1929-35, prof. 1935-46; also asst. dean College Liberal Arts, 1925-30, dir. summer session 1930-39; engaged in research in spl. assessments, U. of Chicago 1922-24; now pres. Miami Univ., Oxford, Ohio; dir. Cincinnati br., Cleveland Fed. Reserve Bank, 1948. Administration member of national code authority under N. R. A. for cotton cloth glove, academic costume, and household ice refrigerator industries, special assessment and federal tax consultant; mem. research staff; Rep. National Committee, 1944. Member Headquarters Company, 354th Regiment, 89th Division, and personnel officer 7th (dev.) Patt., Camp Dix, N. J., for alien enemies, World War I. Pres. Assn., Am. Assn. of Summer Session Dirs., 1934. Mem. Am. Econ. Assn., Farm Econ. Assn., Am. Assn. of Univ. Profs., Nat. Tax Assn., Am. Legion, Phi Delta Phi, Beta Gamma Sigma, Delta Sigma Rho, Phi Beta Kappa, Acacia. Methodist. Mason. Clubs: University (Cincinnati); Kiwanis. Contr. to encyclopedia and author of articles on finance. Home: Lewis Pl. Office: Miami Univ., Oxford, O. Died Nov. 25, 1952. Dr. Hahne's warmth and sincerity is not revealed in the above biography. Also, it does not mention that during his somewhat short years as president he can be credited with establishing a Graduate School with its own dean, the Miami University Foundation, and a long overdue reorganization of the administration.

    Hall Auditorium

    John W. Hall 1802-1886

    Hall Auditorium is named for the fifth president of Miami University. Although a southerner, he served during the years of the civil war. He was a Presbyterian minister as were his four predecessors. In Old Miami, Dr. Upham wrote about President Hall as follows: "Doctor Hall, a fine Southern gentleman of the old school, who with rare tact and splendid self-control had directed the affairs of this patriotic northern college, found at last, when the struggle was over, that hostility had arisen and his usefulness was ended." His vita as published in the Centennial Edition of the Miami University Alumni Catalogue reads as follows: DD., Miami Univ., 1848. Studied theology with Dr. Gidean Blackburn and was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of West Tennessee, Oct. 1824. Evangelist in West Tenn. 1824-26; Pastor, Murfreesboro, Tenn., 1826-30; Gallatin, Tenn., 1830-1840. Organized and acted as President of a Female Seminary at Gallatin, 1837-40. Organized and acted as President of a Female Seminary at Gallatin, 1837-40. Pastor Dayton, O., 1840-52; Huntsville, Ala., 1852-54. President Miami Univ., 1854-66. Supt. Public Schools, Covington, Ky., 1866-76. Born, Orange County, N. C., Jan. 19, 1802. Died, Jan. 6, 1886. The building now known as Hall Auditorium was completed in 1908 and for eighteen years was called either the Administration Building or the Auditorium. In September of 1926 it was named Benton Hall, after the twelfth president, and was so designated until 1969 when the Benton name was shifted to a new classroom building.

    Hamilton Hall

    Elizabeth W. Hamilton 1873-1970

    Originally known as North Hall, the woman's residence hall built in 1940 was named Hamilton Hall in 1948. Although Dean Hamilton had retired in 1945, the naming of a building for a living person was an exception to the rules that then prevailed. Elizabeth W. Hamilton was born in Gallipolis, Ohio on August 23, 1873. She was graduated from Oxford College in 1895 with two degrees, a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Science in Music. Subsequently she did graduate work at the University of Chicago and at Miami University. The LL. D. degree was conferred on her by Western College in 1934 and Miami University in 1945. From 1897 to 1905 Miss Hamilton taught Greek and English at Oxford College and was its dean 1904-05. She joined the Miami University staff in 1905 as the Dean of Women and served in this capacity for 40 years until her retirement in 1945. She also held faculty rank as an assistant professor of Greek, and later as an assistant professor of English. Dean Hamilton was active for many years in the American Association of University Women serving as fellowship chairman of the local chapter for 20 years and of the state for 12 years. She was Ohio AAUW president 1937-39 and this organization established an endowment in her name for an international fellowship. In 1929 she served on a Council of One Hundred Women at the National Assembly of the Presbyterian Church and helped to formulate policies that gave women wider participation in the government of that denomination. She served the National Association of Deans of Women as chairman of the university section and as president of the Ohio Association of Deans of Women. Other affiliations included the Oxford Women's Club, the Arts Club, and the Music Club. She was the Presbyterian Church organist for twenty years. After retirement Dean Hamilton spent most of her time at Kittery Point, Maine where she died December 2, 1970 at the age of 97. She will long be affectionately remembered by generations of Miami students. As Miami's first dean of women she discharged the changing responsibilities of this office with rare tact, skill, and diplomacy.

    Hanna House

    Martha Jane Hanna 1878-1958

    A new home management house was constructed on Spring Street in 1963. It, together with the nursery school attached, was designed to provide facilities for young women wishing to learn home management through actual experience. The appropriate name selected was Hanna House in honor of the first professor and chairman of the Department of Home Economics. Martha Jane Hanna was born in Oquawka, Illinois on April 25, 1878. She attended public school at Monmouth College in 1901. She taught in Warren County and Monmouth public schools from 1901 to 1906, and for seven years was head of the Latin Department at Western Illinois University, which was known at that time as Macomb State Normal College. Graduate work at the University of Chicago followed and she received a master's degree in home economics from Columbia University in 1915. In the fall of 1915 Miss Hanna arrived on the Miami campus to head the home economics department that had been established in 1909. She was made a full professor in 1918 and became professor emeritus in 1947. Her major interest was dietetics and she was associated with both the state and the national dietetic associations. Considered an ideal teacher, the department flourished under her leadership. After retirement Miss Hanna returned to Monmouth where she died April 6, 1958, a few days short of her 80th birthday.

    Harris Hall

    Andrew Lintner Harris 1835-1915

    A new structure erected in 1961 was officially named Harris Hall by the Board of Treustees but the name Harris Dining Hall is much more commonly used. The building includes four dining rooms served from a common kitchen. It replaced "South Dining Hall," a temporary wooden structure acquired as World War II surplus in 1946. Biographies of General Harris (or Governor Harris) appear in Who Was Who in America, Vol. I, 1897-1942 and in the National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. XIV. The Centennial Catalog also cites the History of Preble County 1900 as a source of information. The sketch in Who Was Who reads as follows: Harris, Andrew Lintner, govornor; b. Butler Co., O., Nov. 17, 1835; s. Benjamin and Nancy (Lintner) H.; B. S., Miami U., 1860 (LL. D., 1906, Ohio Wesleyan, 1907). Second lt. 20th Ohio Inf., Apr. 17, 1861; capt., May 27, 1861; 2d lt. 75th Ohio Inf., Oct. 3, 1861; capt., Nov. 9, 1861; maj., Mar. 13, 1863; bvdt. brig. gen. vols., Mar. 13, 1865, for distinguished and gallant services; hon. mustered out, Jan. 17, 1865; m. Caroline Conger, Oct. 15, 1865. Admitted to bar 1865; probate judge, Preble Co., 1875-82; mem. Ohio Senate, 1865-67, Ho. of Rep., 1885-89; lt. gov. of Ohio, 1892-96; mem. U. S. Industrial Comn., 1898-1902; gov. of Ohio, 1906-08. Home: Eaton, O. Died Sept. 13, 1915. Harris Hall was dedicated on September 16, 1961. Edward W. Nippert, Chairman of the Board, presided and President Millett was a speaker. It is interesting that the Harris Scholarships established, in part, in memory of Andrew L. Harris by his son always refer to the father as Colonel Andrew L. Harris.

    Harrison Hall

    Benjamin Harrison 1833-1901

    Harrison Hall has been the name of two buildings built on the same site. The original building was partially constructed in 1816 and several additions were made to it - the last in 1898. It was known by various names over the many decades it served as the college office and classroom building. Of these Old Main is the one best remembered until in 1931 it was christened Harrison Hall. In 1956 the building was condemned and was razed in 1958 to make room for the present Harrison Hall. Practically all biographical references include Benjamin Harrison because he was the 23rd president of the United States. His sketch as it appears in the Centennial Edition of the Miami University Catalog reads as follows: A. B. (1852), A. M., 1855. LL. D., Miami Univ. 1889; Coll. of New Jersey, 1889. Secretary of the first National Phi Delta Theta Convention, Cincinnati, O., 1851. Admitted to the bar, 1854. Practiced law at Indianapolis, Ind., 1854-89, 1893-1901. Reporter of the Supreme Court of Indiana, 1860-62 and 1864-68. Was commissioned as Second Lieutenant of Ind. Col., July, 1862. Raised Company A of the 70th Ind. Vol. Inf., and was commissioned Captain and later Colonel, 1862-65, Preveted Brigadier-Gen., Feb. ,1865. Republican candidate for Governor of Ind., 1876. Appointed a member of the Mississippi River Commission, 1879. U. S. Senator from Indiana, 1881-1887. President of the U. S., 1889-93. Chief Consul for the government of Venezuela in the boundary dispute between that country and Great Britain, submitted to an arbitration tribunal. Author of Indiana Supreme Court reports, Vols. 15-17 and 23-29; "This Country of Ours," 1897. Born, North Bend, Hamilton county, O., Aug. 20, 1833. Died, March 13, 1901. The above biography omits mention of the fact that Benjamin Harrison began his college career at Freeman Cary's Farmers' College in College Hill, Cincinnati when Doctor Scott, who operated a female seminary as part of the college, transferred his talents to the Oxford Female Institute. His daughter Caroline (she became Mrs. Benjamin Harrison in 1953) came to Oxford with her father and Benjamin followed along. The new Harrison Hall was dedicated on May 9, 1959.

    Havighurst Hall

    Marion Boyd Havighurst 1897-1974 Walter E. Havighurst 1901-

    A residence hall built on the Western Campus of Miami University was first occupied in August, 1893. Following a recommendation from the Board of Trustees of the Western College Alumnae Association the Board of Trustees of Miami University approved naming the building Havighurst Hall. In view of its location and the ties to Western and Miami represented by Mr. and Mrs. Havighurst, the name chosen was most appropriate. Marion Margaret (Boyd) Havighurst was born in Marietta, Ohio on January 8, 1897. She was the daughter of William Waddell and MAry Arnold (Gates) Boyd. In 1914 her father assuemed the presidency of Western College and her lifelong Oxford residency began. In 1916 she received an A. B. degree from Smith College and in 1926 she earned an M. A. degree from Yale. During the 1918-1919 school year she served as SATC secretary at Miami, was an instructor in English at Western College 1920-23, and an instructor in English at Miami University 1926-30 and 1933-34. On December 22, 1930 she married Walter E. Havighurst. Mrs. Havighurst was the author of Silent Winds (poetry), 1926, Murder in the Stacks, 1934, Strange Island, 1957, and The Sycamore Tree, 1960. In collaboration with her husband she was the co-author of High Prairie, 1944, Song of the Pines, 1949, and Climb a Lofty Ladder, 1951. She was a member of the Ohio Valley Poetry Society and the Edward MacDowell Society. In 1932 she was a resident at the MacDowell colony. A brief biography of her career appeared in Volume III of American Women, 1939-40. She died in Oxford on February 24, 1974. Walter E. Havighurst's biography in Who's Who in America, 39th Edition, 1976-77 included the following information: Havighurst, Walter, author, educator; b. Appleton, Wisc., Nov. 28, 1901; s. Freeman Alfred and Winifred Aurelia (Weter) H.; student, Ohio Wesleyan U., 1919-21; A. B., U. of Denver, 1924; S. T. B., Boston U., 1926; student Kings Coll., U. of London (Eng.) 1926-27; A. M., Columbia, 1926; Litt. D., Lawrence Coll., 1947, Ohio Wesleyan U., 1947, MArietta Coll., 1959; L. H. D., Miami U., 1959; m. Marion Boyd, Dec. 22, 1930 (dec. Feb. 1974), Asst. prof of English, Miami U., Oxford, O., 1928-37, assoc. prof., 1937-42, prof. 1942-50, research prof., 1950-67, regents prof., 1967-69, prof. emeritus 1969--; lectr. English U. of Cin., 1935-37. Served with U. S. Mcht. Marine 1921-22. Recipient Ohioana Writers award, 1947-48, Soc. Midland Authors award, 1972. Trustee Ohioana Library Assn. Mem. Soc. Am. Historians, Soc. Midland Authors, Authors League Am., A. A. U. P., Phi Delta Theta, Phi Beta Kappa (hon.). The above biography also included a list of many of the twenty-seven books he has authored (including three co-authored with his wife) that were published between 1935 and 1982. These included novels such as Pier 17, 1935, and non-fictional historical studies of midwestern personages such as Annie Oakley of the Wild West, 1954. According to A Biographical Guide to Midwestern Literature published by the University of Iowa Press, several reviewers have referred to Mr. Havighurst as the outstanding interpreter of the American Midwest. Because of his ability as a narrative historian he was selected to write the official Bi-Centennial History of Ohio in 1976. In 1980 he was selected for the Ohio Citizens Hall of Fame. He continues to publish as evidenced by the appearance of The Dolibois Years in 1982.

    Hepburn Hall

    Andrew Dousa Hepburn 1830-1921

    The present Hepburn Hall, completed in 1964, is the second building on the campus to bear the name of the seventh president of Miami. The original Hepburn Hall was situated a short distance west and north of Bishop Hall. It was built in 1905 at which time it was the first women's residence hall. This use continued until 1961 when the building became a music practice house. In 1964 the Board of Trustees assigned the name of President Hepburn to a new residence hall as by that time it was obvious that the older building would have to be demolished whenever King Library was completed. Between 1964 and 1972, when the building was razed, it was known as Clokey Hall. Dr. Hepburn was a son-in-law of William Holmes McGuffey. His career outlined below indicates that he was away from the Miami campus from 1873 to 1885. These were the years Miami was closed. When he returned he held the administrative posts of chairman of the English department and was the first dean of the College of Liberal Arts at the New Miami. He also served as vice president of the University from 1902 until 1908, wen he retired. His biographical sketch as it appears in Who Was Who in America, 1897-1942, reads as follows: Hepburn, Andrew Dousa, educator; b. Williamsport, Pa., Nov. 14, 1830; s. Samuel and Rebecca (Williamson) H.; A. B., Jefferson Coll., Pa., 1851; grad. U. of Va., 1854, Princeton Theol. Sem., 1857; (D. D., Hampden-Sidney, 1876; LL. D., U. of N. C., 1881); m. Henrietta McGuffey, Juky 10, 1857; father of Charles McGuffey H. Stated supply Harrisonburg, Va., 1857-58; ordained Presbyn. ministry, Oct. 22, 1858; pastor New Providence, Va., 1858-60; prof. logic, rhetoric and English lang. and lit., U. of N. C., 1860-67, same chairs Miami U., Oxford, O., 1868-73, pres., Miami U., 1871-73; prof. mental philosophy and English lit., 1874-85, pres., 1877-85, Davidson Coll., N. C.; prof. English lang. and lit., Miami U., 1885-1908, resigned. Died Feb. 14, 1921.

    Herron Hall

    John Williamson Herron 1827-1912

    The present women's physical education building, constructed in 1962, is the second building to bear the Herron name. The original gymnasium, famous because it was moved east from its construction site, was usually called Herron gym. Plans to raze this building, which have not uet been carried out, seemed to warrant transferring the name to another gymnasium. In the meantime the older building was renamed Van Voorhis Hall. A rather lengthy biography of Mr. Herron appearing in the National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. XXIV, makes note of the fact that of his eight children one daughter Helen became the wife of President William Houward Taft. It also mentions that he was a trustee of Miami University for 52 years and that it was due to his efforts that Miami was able to open its doors in 1885. The biographical sketch that appears in the Centennial Edition of the Miami University Catalogue reads as follows: A. B. (1845), A. M., 1851. LL. D., 1889. Admitted to the bar 1848, Cincinnati, O. Member of the Constitutional Convention of Ohio, 1873-74. U. S. Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio, 1889-94. Member of the Board of Trustees of Miami University since 1860. President of the same since 1880. Senator from Hamilton county, 1895-97. Delivered annual address before Alumni Association, Miami Univ., 1895. Law firm, Herron, Gatch & Herron. Vide, sketch and portrait, "Miami Journal," Vol. II., No. 8. Born, Franklin country, Pa., May 10, 1827. Residence adress, 305 Pike St., Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. Herron was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He was married Mar. 7, 1854 to Harriet Collins of Lowville, N. Y. He died in Cincinnati Aug. 6, 1912. The present Herron Hall was dedicated on October 27, 1962. His grandson Charles P. Taft participated in the ceremonies.

    Hiestand Hall

    Harvey H. Hiestand 1872-1944

    Hiestand Hall was the first building named for a former faculty member. It honored Harvey H. Hiestand who had been instrumental in establishing the Department of Architecture in the School of Fine Arts. Harvey H. Hiestand was born July 29, 1872. He attended Miami University for two years, 1889-91, during which time he joined Phi Delta Theta Fraternity. He then transferred to the Art Institute in Chicago and received a Diploma in Architecture in 1893. After serving as a draftsman for five years in Boston he became a designer for the firm of F. M. Andrews, which had offices in Dayton, Cincinnati, and New York City. From 1914 on he practiced on his own and became a member of the American Isntitute of Architects in 1920. In 1929 he was appointed as Professor of Architecture at Miami and, among other duties, planned a campus that included a women's quadrangle, a student center, and other features now in existence. After serving as a full-time professor for six years he became a lecturer in architecture in 1935 and in 1943 became a lecturer emeritus. In 1929-30 he was acting head of the Department of Architecture. Mr. Hiestand was the architect for several buildings including the Sinton Hotel in Cincinnati, the state capitol at Frankfort, Kentucky, the Preble County Courthouse in Eaton, and the central section of Miami's Wade MacMillan Hospital. Although a bachelor all of his life, Mr. Hiestand maintained a gracious home in Eaton, Ohio where he died on October 9, 1944. In 1956 the family presented to the University nineteen oils and water colors from his private collection including six of his own water colors from his private collection including siz of his own water colors painted during his frequent trips to Europe. Hiestand Hall was dedicated on October 5, 1958.

    Hughes Laboratories

    Raymond Mollyneaux Hughes 1873-1958

    Hughes Laboratories, dedicated on October 2, 1970, is the second building on the campus to bear the name of the thirteenth president of Miami. When the present Kreger was constructed (the center section was completed in 1931), it was appropriately named Hughes Hall as it housed the Department of Chemistry and President Hughes had originally been a chemistry teacher. Consequently, when the Department of Chemistry was moved to new quarters in 1970, it was again appropriate that the Hughes name be transferred to the new building. The biographical sketch of President Hughes as it appears in Who Was Who, Vol. III, 1951-1960, reads as follows: Hughes, Raymond Mollyneaux, coll. pres.; b. Atlantic, Ia., Jan. 14, 1873; s. Melancthon and Emily (Mollyneaux) H.; A. B., Miami Univ., 1893, LL. D., 1927; fellow in chemistry Ohio State U., 1895-97, M. Sc., 1897; Mass. Inst. Tech., 1897-98; LL. D., Coe College, 1928, Iowa State Coll., 1936; m. Ella Brainerd Rogers, July 11, 1901 (dec); children--Thomas Rogers (dec.), Emily Mollyneaux (Mrs. Joseph C. Boyce); m. 2d. Helen Idsardi Richardson, 1938. Sci. tchr. Hamilton (O) High School 1893-95; prof. physics and chemistry Miami U., 1898-1904, chemistry 1904-13, dean Coll. of Liberal Arts, 1908-11, acting pres., July 1, 1911, pres., 1913-27; pres. Ia. State Coll., 1927-36, now emeritus. Edn. dir. S. A. T. C., Dist. 6, 1918. Sec.-treas. Assn. A,. Colls., 1918-21; sec. Commn. on Higher Edn. North Central Assn. of Colleges and Secondary Schs., 1923-26; sec. Am. Council on Edn., 1924-27, chmn., 1932-33; sec. Nat. Assn. State Univs., 1926-27; dir. Presbyn. Theol. Sem., 1939-1942, mem. special com. on Board of Pensions of Presbyn. Ch., 1940-41. Mem. Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Beta Kappa. Republican. Presbyn. Auhtor: A Manual for College Trustees, 1943;(with W. H. Lancelot) Education, America's Magic, 1946; A Study of American Graduate Schools Conferring the Doctorate, 1946. Home: Memorial Union, Ames, Ia. Died September 22, 1958. This factual listing of the many accomplishments of President Hughes fails to mention that he headed Miami University longer than any other president except President Bishop (1824-41). During his tenure he doubled the University lands, introduced intramural sports, built or enlarged eight buildings, and provided Miami University with innovative and strong leadership. He was warmly regarded by faculty and students alike.

    Joyner House

    Fred Bunyan Joyner 1895-1965

    Joyner House, currently serving as office space for the Office of Student Aid, is so named because it was sold to the University by the Joyner family. At one time he was known as Herald House and housed a dozen young women who ate their meals at adjacent Wells Hall. A biography of Dr. Joyner taken from Who Was Who in America, 1961-68, reads as follows: Joyner, Fred Bunyan, prof. history; b. Ethelville, Ala., Apr. 16, 1895; s. James Burrell and Cornelia Alice (Graham) J.; A. B., Birmingham-Southern Coll., Birmingham, Ala., 1916; diploma, U. of Caen, France, 1919; A. M., U. of Chicago, 1920, Ph. D., 1929; m. Mae Drake, Sept. 9, 1924; children - Thomas Edward, Lee Drake. Instr. Ballinger (Tex) High Sch., 1916-17; instr. history Hedding Coll., Abingdon, Ill., 1921-22; asst. prof. history Miami U., Oxford, O., 1922-30, asso. prof. history 1930-40, prof. history since 1940. Served with U. S. Army, 1917-18. Mem. Am. Legion, Pi Kappa Alpha, Phi Beta Kapa, Kappa Phi Kappa, Democrat, Methodist. Author: David Ames Wells - Champion of Free Trade, 1939. Contbr. articles to professional journals. Home: 231 E. Spring St., Oxford, O., 45056. Died Apr. 23, 1965; buried Miami Univ. sect. of cemetery, Oxford, O. Dr. Joyner was one of Miami's most colorful professors. He retained his southern accent and used it to full advantage when teaching courses covering Civil War days. He also had the distinction of living in the last private residence completely surrounded by the campus.

    King Library

    Edgar Weld King 1893-1969

    Originally known as the King Undergraduate Library when the south section was completed in 1966, the word "undergraguate" was dropped when the north half was completed in 1972. At that time the name Alumni Library was changed to Alumni Hall, except for storage, was abandoned for library purposes. There was never any doubt about attaching the King name to the library as he was responsible for its development over 34 years. He was born in Berlin, Germany December 24, 1893, the son of Dr. Henry Churchill King, a longtime president of Oberlin College. After earning an A. B. degree at Oberlin in 1916, he received a diploma from the Library School of New York University and a Master of Arts degree from Columbia University in 1922. That year he was appointed librarian at Miami and served continuously until his retirement in 1956. In 1957 the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred on him by Miami. During his years as head of the library it grew from 67,000 volumes to over 350,000 volumes. Of particular interest was his personal collection of more than 5,000 volumes of juvenile literature, which he presented to the University. He also acquired many other valuable books, particularly at farm sales, which he presented to the library although paid for out of his own pocket. During world War I he served overseas in the 42d (Rainbow) Division receiving a citation for assisting in the rescue of wounded comrades under fire. This facet of his life seems incongruous with the soft-spoken and almost shy librarian known to many, many faculty, staff, and students. Dr. King died at Christ Hospital in Cincinnati on May 29, 1969. He was survived by his daughter Mrs. Sarah Conklin.

    Kreger Hall

    Clarence W. Kreger 1896-1960

    The present Kreger Hall was completed in 1939 although the central section was built in 1931 and the east wing in 1937. It was built for chemistry and, at that time, was named for President Hughes. When the Hughes name was transferred to the laboratories under construction in 1968, the older building that was to be remodeled as a home for the School of Applied Science was given the Kreger name. This action taken by the Board of Trustees on June 7, 1968 was most appropriate as Dr. Kreger had practically designed the building at a time when he was Professor of Chemistry and had been influential in developing many of the technical programs that led to the creation of the School of Applied Science. His biographical sketch as it appears in Who Was Who, Vol. IV, 1961-68, reads as follows: Kreger, Clarence W., univ. provost; b. Louisville, June 1, 1896; s. William G. and Eva M. (Everle) K., 1925; m. Helen Beaseley Zink, June 20, 1923; children-- William E., Robert D. (dec.). Asst. prof. chemistry Miami U., 1919-20, 1922-25, asso. prof., 1925-37, prof. since 1937, assistant dean Coll. Liberal Arts, 1930-47, administrative asst. to pres., 1946-48, v. p., 1948-51, chief exec. officer, 1951-52, acting president, 1952-53, provost, 1953--; educational director Navy V-12 program, 1942-45, institutional rep. E.S.M.W.T. program, 1943-45. Coll. and univ. examiner N. Central Assn. of Colls. and Secondary Schs. since 1938. Cons. field coll. and univ. admstrn., orgn. and academic curricula. Registered profl. engr., Ohio. Fellow A. A. A. S.; mem. N. E. A., Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, Phi Lambda Upsilon, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Alpha Chi Sigma. Mason. Home: Cook Pl., Oxford, O. Died Nov. 19, 1960. The February, 1961 issue of The Miami Almunus presents a lengthy report on Dr. Kreger's almost forty years of service to his Alma Mater. Reading it provides an insight completely lacking in the above sketch.

    Kumler Memorial Chapel

    Jeremiah Prophet Elias Kumler 1830-1909

    The beautiful grey stone building known as Kumler Chapel was dedicated on November 28, 1918. It was a gift to Western College by Mrs. Anna Kumler Wight of the class of 1879 and her sister Mrs. Ella Kumler McKelvy. Mrs. Wight and Mrs. McKelvy were daughters of the Rev. Jeremiah P. E. Kumler. Their mother, Abbie C. D. Goulding, taught at the Western Female Seminary for one year during which time their father conducted a succesful courtship. The Rev. Jeremiah P. E. Kumler, Minister, Washington D. C. A. B., A. M., 1856. B. D., Lane Seminary, 1856. D. D., MArietta Coll. LL. D., Miami Univ., 1895. Ordained by the Dayton Presbytery, April, 1857. Pastor of Pres. churches at Greenville, O., 1856-60; Oxford, O., 1860-68; Evansville, Ind., 1868-71; Indianapolis, Ind., 1871-75; Cincinnati, O., 1875-84; Pittsburg, Pa., 1884-1901. Member and president of the Board of Trustees of the Western College, Oxford, O., twenty years. Author of "premillenarianism," a pamphlet and of several published sermons. Delivered Commencement address, Miami Univ., 1900. Abroad 1887. Visited England, Scotland, Germany and France. Cousin of Jacob A. Zeller, '56. Born Lewisburg, O., Aug. 16, 1830. Died, Washington, D. C., Jan. 3, 1909. At the time of the dedication the Kumler daughters indicated that, because of the interest and participation of their grandfather Elias in the early life of Western College, they were pleased to honor him as well as their father. Elias Kumler was born. Oct. 21, 1809 and died on Dec. 6, 1873. He was a banker in Oxford, Ohio who contributed $5,000 to help start the Western Female Seminary and subsequently forgave a debt of $2,000 owed by the Seminary. He was also an early member of the Board of Trustees.

    Langstroth Cottage

    Lorenzo Lorraine Langstroth 1810-1895

    The oldest building on the Western College campus of Miami University is the Langstroth Cottage that faces Patterson Avenue south of Bachelor Hall. According to Narka Nelson's The Western College for Women it was built in 1856 by the Reverend Edward Root. In 1859 he sold it to the Revered Lorenzo Langstroth. Much later it was purchased by Miss Susan Peabody, niece of Helen Peabody, who gave it to Western College. Used for many years as a faculty residence in 1966 the trustees of Western College designated it as the residence of the Dean of Students. LANGSTROTH, Lorenzo Lorraine, educator, apiarist; b. Phila., Dec. 25, 1810; s. John G. and Rebekah (Dunn) L.; grad. Yale, 1831; m. Anne Tucker, Aug. 22, 1936, 3 children. Prin., Abbot Acad., Andover, Mass., 1838-39; prin. High Sch. for Young Ladies, Greenfield, Mass., 1838-44; prin. school for young ladies at Phila., 1848-52; invented movable frame beehive. Author: Langstroth on the Hive and Honeybee, 1853. Died Oxford, O., Oct. 6, 1895. The Langstroth Cottage was threatened with destruction in 1977 when a site was being selected for Bachelor Hall. It was saved when the north entrance to the Western campus of Patterson Avenue was moved south of Langstroth Cottage and the Corson and Stancote houses were razed.

    Laws Hall

    Samuel Spahr Laws 1824-1921

    The home of the School of Business Administration, Laws Hall was completed in 1959. It was named for one of the most illustrious graduates of Miami, Class of 1948, who was a minister, lawyer, physician, financier, and college president. His biography, as it appear in Who Was Who, Vol. I, 1897-1942, mentions his invention of the stock market ticker but fails to describe his role as an employer of Thomas A. Edison. Laws, Samuel Spahr, educator; b. Ohio County, Va., Mar. 23, 1824; s. Rev. James and Rachel (Spahr) L.; A. B. Miami U., valedictorian, 1848 (Phi Beta Kappa), A. M., 1851; grad. Princeton Theol. Sem., 1851; LL. B., Columbia, 1870; M. D., Bellevue Hosp. Medical Coll. (New York U.), 1875; LL. D. Westminster Coll., 1871; D. D., Wash. and Lee, 1894; Litt. D., Miami; m. Ann Maria, d. William Broadwell, Jan. 1860. Ordained Presbyn. ministry, 1851; pastor West Ch., St. Louis, 1851-53; prof. phys. science, 1854-55, pres. U. of Mo., 1876-89, resigned; commd. maj. by Gov. Marmaduke in organizing mil. dept. of Univ.; apptd. visitor to West Point, 1882; Perkins prof. natural science in connection with revelation and Christian apologetics, Presbyterian Theol. Sem., Columbia, S. C., 1893-98. Inventor and introducer of system of simultaneous telegraphing of market reports ("tickers"). Del. Pan-Presbyn. Council, Washington, 1899. Author: The Attonement; The Trinity. Address: Washington, D. C. Died Jan. 9, 1921. This report would not be complete without mentioning that Dr. Laws presented to Miami University one of the five existing bronze duplicate castings of the Houdon statue of George Washington.

    Lewis Place

    Romeo Lewis 1795-1843

    Much has been written about Lewis Place but very little about the man responsible for its name. Romeo Lewis was a wealthy Connecticut gentleman who, judging from his year of death and age at that time, must have been born in 1795, or possibly 1794. During extended stays in Florida he had become acquainted with southern architecture, which accounts for the style of the home he built in Oxford. On July 26, 1837, when he was 42, he married Jane North Lewis, the widow of his brother George. She did not want to live in Florida and he did not want to live in Connecticut so they compromised onOxford where another brother, Harry, was already a leading citizen and successful business man. Lewis Place was built in 1838. Romeo and Jane had four children but none of them lived for more than a few years. Romeo's business activities, both before and after marriage, were concentrated on real estate transaction. He invested in store buildings and lots in Oxford. In addition, at various times, he bought extensive acreage in Indiana, Illinois, Arkansas, Florida, and Kentucky. Sometimes he had to borrow money and in other instances he experienced difficulty in collecting from those to whom he sold land. At the time of his death in 1843 his estate was estimated at $60,000 but it took several years to clear various legal claims and counter-claims. Mrs. Lewis continued to live in Lewis Place until her death in 1888. The property then came into the possession of a nephew, Philip Moore, Class of 1870, who leased it rent-free to the University for a president's home in 1904. In 1909 the property was purchased. An interesting and detailed story of Lewis Place and the Lewis family can be found in Old Oxford Houses written by Mrs. W. E. Smith.

    Logan Lodge

    Anna Elizabeth Logan 1861-1941

    Logan Lodge was built in 1948 to house 80 women who were to become elementary school teachers. The original sketch indicates that it was designed to be a temporary building. It was appropriately named for Anna E. Logan, who was a member of the first faculty of the Normal College (subsequently the School of Education) of Miami University. Born July 13, 1861 in Clermont County, Miss Logan attended Cincinnati University and the Chicago Normal School. She then taught several years in the Cincinnati school system. When the Ohio State Normal College of Miami University first came into existence in 1902, she joined the staff as Principal of the Training Department and Instructor in Latin in the Academy. Miami University awarded her an honorary A.. M. degree in 1906. Over the ensuing years her academic title at Miami underwent several changes. In the catalog for 1904-05 her designation is Principal of Training Department and Professor of Methods, which Professor of School Methods the following year. In 1906-07 her rank was Supervisor of Training was changed to Supervisor of Primary Grade Training. The last change in 1911-12 was to Supervisor of Primary Grades and Professor of Method. In 1915 the Teacher's College replaced the Ohio State Normal College and Miss Logan returned to the Cincinnati school system. From 1915 to 1929 she served as assistant superintendent of the Cincinnati schools and then retired. At that time she moved back to Oxford to live with her brother, Samuel T. Logan, who was a retired Cincinnati school principal. Her memberships included the National Society fro the Scientific Study of Education and the Presbyterian Church. Following her death in Oxford on June 5, 1941 a group of Cincinnati teachers working through the Loyalty Fund created and funded the Anna E. Logan Memorial Loan Fund of Miami University.

    Mac Cracken Hall

    Henry Mitchell Mac Cracken 1840-1918

    When the first (west) wing of a new women's residence hall was completed in 1957 the building was called Center Hall. Upon completion in 1961 it was named for an Oxford boy and Miami alumnus who became one of the country's leading educator's. The building was dedicated on September 16, 1961. Who Was Who in America, Vol. I, 1897-1942, has the following biography: Mc Cracken, Henry Mitchell, chancellor; b. Oxford, O., Sept. 28, 1940; s. Rev. John Steele and Eliza (Hawkins-Dougherty) M.; A. B., Miami U., 1857; U. P., Theol. Sem., Xenia, O., 1860-62, Princeton Theol. Sem., 1862-63; D. D., Wittenberg, 1878; LL. D., Miami, 1887, New York, 1910; m. Catherine Hubbard, July 2, 1872. Teacher and supt. schs. in Ohio, 1857-61; ordained to the Presbyn. ministry, 1863; pastor Westminster Ch., Columbus, 1863-67, First Ch., Toledo, 1868-81; prof. philosophy and chancellor, Western U. of Pa. (now U. of Pittsburgh), 1881-84; prof. philosophy, 1884--, vice-chancellor, 1885-91, chancellor, 1891-1910, New York U. Del. Gen. Assembly, Free Church of Scotland and of Irish Presbyterian General Assembly, 1867; committeeman for life of the Hall of Fanem organized by him, 1900. Author: Tercentenary of Presbyterianism, 1870; Leaders of the Church Universal (3 volumes), 1870; Cities and Universities, 1882; The Scotch-Irish in America, 1884; John Calvin, 1888; A Metropolitan University, 1892; Educational Progress in the United States, 1893; The Three Essentials, 1901; The Hall of Fame, 1901; Urgent Eastern Questions, 1912. Address: New York, N. Y. Died Dec. 24, 1918. The Miami University Bulletin Alumni News Letter of February, 1919 has an interesting obituary in which his career at New York University and his sponsorship of its Hall of Fame is given greater emphasis. It also mentions that he died in Orlando, Florida at the age of 78 - he had retired from New York University when he became 70.

    Ogden Hall

    George Campbell Ogden 1841-1911

    Ogden Hall was built in 1924 and named in honor of George Campbell Ogden, a member of the Class of 1863. When his sister, Mrs. Laura Ogden Whaling died in 1915 she willed $270,000 to the University to construct the building as a memorial to her brother. George Campbell Ogden was born at Mt. Adams, Cincinnati, on March 10, 1841. He attended the Ebin S. Brooks school in preparation for entering Miami University. After receiving his A. B. degree in 1863 he enrolled in the Ohio Medical College and was graduated with an M. D. degree in 1866. Although he practiced in Cincinnati for many years, he was more interested in chemistry and the theory of medicine than he was in building up a large practice. Eventually he stopped being a physician and devoted his time to managing real estate. Mr. Ogden was fond of the classics and of mythology and enjoyed putting old myths into verse. Also, he was a painter of considerable ability. He died in Norwood, Ohio on December 1, 1911. After his death a classmate, Charles Fisk, who had become a lawyer and was the attorney for the Ogden estate, edited a book of Mr. Ogden's poems.

    Patterson Place

    James Ramsey Patterson 1834-1913

    Originally known as the "Glenwilde" hom facing Patterson Avenue was built by James R. Patterson in 1898. He used it as a summer home and was in residence at the time of his death on June 4, 1913. In 1914 the house and 70 acres of land adjoining the Western campus were given to Western College by Mr. Patterson's two sisters, Miss Alice C. Patterson and Mrs. G. S. Bishop, who had inherited the property from their bachelor brother. The house was appropriately named Patterson Place and became the home of the presidents of Western College from 1914 to 1974. Currently it houses the offices of the Western College Alumnae Association and is known officially as the Western College Archives and Museum. James R. Patterson was born Nov. 3, 1834 in Mt. Pleasant, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Rev. Andrew O. and MAria (Speer) Patterson. The family moved to New Lisbon, Ohio in 1840 and to Hamilton, Ohio in 1851. In 1854 James Patterson spent one year at Jefferson College at Cannonsburg, Pa. and then transferred to Miami University, earning an A. B. degree in 1858. The Centennial Edition of the Miami Catalogue has the following listing for James Ramsay Patterson who is identified as a member of Phi Delta Theta and land ownder residing in Oxford, Ohio: A. B. Student, Jefferson College, Pa., 1857-58. Was engaged in General Commission business in Cincinnati, O., 1863-71. Special correspondent, Cincinnati "Commercial Gazette." Trustee, Miami Univ., 1899--. Summer residence, Oxford, O.; Winter residence, Mansfield, La. Mr. Patterson continued as a trustee until his death. He was a devoted alumnus and generous benefactor of Miami and other institutions. He was one of the two largest donors to the Alumni Library, he contributed $5,000 to a student loan fund, he endowed the McFarland Mathematical prize, and in 1911 established the Patterson Mathematical prize. A grateful Miami University conferred the LL. D. degree on him in 1912.

    Murstein Alumni Center

    William Murstein 1897-1967

    Late in 1967 the staff of the Alumni Association moved into a new base of operations - the Murstein Alumni Center. A substantial part of the cost of the main building had been contributed by William Murstein and by his heirs. William Murstein was born January 17, 1897 in Sharon, Pennsylvania. He was the third son of Max and Millie Harris Murstein. His formal education, which had started in the public schools of Sharon, was interrupted when he withdrew from high school to help provide financial support to his family. During World War I he served in the United States Marine Corps. Following his honorable discharge from service Mr. Murstein was in business in Youngstown and in Cleveland before opening Wilmurs, a department store, in Hamilton, Ohio in March of 1935. From this date until his death Bill Murstein, as he was well known, devoted much time and gave substantial sums to a variety of worthwhile projects. In 1960 Miami conferred on him an LL. D. degree. His citation read in part as follows: "During his twenty-five years in Hamilton Mr. Murstein has been president of the Community Chest, president of the Hamilton Chapter of the American Red Cross, chairman of the Salvation Army Board, first president of the United Appeals, vice-president of the Family Service of Hamilton, chairman of the Mayor's Committee on Water, and chairman of a Citizens Committee investigating mental health conditions in Butler County. At the state level he has served on the Governor's Committe on the Aged, the Ohio Citizens Council, and on the Board of Directors of the State Cerebral Palsy Association. Recently he has been serving as a member of President Eisenhower's Committee on Government Contracts. He has helped in the construction and maintenance of the New Jerusalem School of Hebrew Union College; his assistance made possible the contruction of the first Reformed Jewish Chapel in Israel. Because of his interest in problems of elderly persons, Mr. Murstein provided the bulk of the funds with which to establish a Senior Citizens Center in Hamilton. This Centeris now known as Murstein House." Gifts made to Miami University, in addition to the Alumni Center, include the establishment of scholarships in memory of each of three brothers, a rare and valuable "Miserere" series of 58 Rouault etchings, the purchase of paintings and art objects, and the support of various lecture series. Mr. Murstein, a bachelor all of his life, died of an apparent heart attack on June 6, 1967. He had planned to be an honored guest at the June 17 cornerstone laying ceremony of the alumni center.

    Helen Peabody Hall

    Helen Peabody 1826-1905

    The original building of Western College was built in 1855. In 1860 it burned to the ground but a year later a new building was opened on the same site. Ten years later, in 1871, it suffered severe damage from fire. It was rebuilt the same year and is still considered the main building on the Western campus. In 1905, while she was still living, The Board of Trustees of Western College wired Miss Peabody that it had voted to name Main Building the Helen Peabody Hall. Miss Peabody was born May 6, 1826 in Newport, New Hampshire, the daughter of Amni and Sarah (Johnson) Peabody. She was graduated from Mt. Holyoke in 1848 and remained as a teacher for five years. In 1853 she moved to St. Louis where she made her home with her brother Charles, an ordained Congregational minister, and his wife. In 1855 she was urged to come to Oxford as the first principal of the Western Female Seminary. As a former pupil and teacher under Mary Lyon, the founder of Mt. Holyoke, she was eminently qualified to establish a "Mount Holyoke in the West." In June, 1887 Miss Peabody requested a leave of absence for the year 1887-1888 but she returned to preside over the 1888 commencement. She then announced her retirement after serving thirty-three years as the first and only Principal of the Seminary. Shortly afterwards she moved to Pasadena, California where she died October 8, 1905.

    Phelps Hall

    Bernard Fred Phelps 1921-

    The Hamilton campus of Miami University was enlarged in 1972 with the completion of a third unit, the Auditorium Technical Building. In 1974 the auditorium was named the Parrish Theater and in 1981 the ATB Building, as it was called, became Phelps Hall honoring the founder and first director of the Hamilton campus. Bernard F. Phelps was born in Augusta, Illinois on September 8, 1921, the son of Timothy R. and Helen (Wood) Phelps. After serving three years in the United States Marine Air Corps, from which he received the Air Medal, he received a Bachelor of Science in Education degree from Indiana State University in 1946. In 1948 Miami University awarded him a Master of Arts degree and Ohio State University conferred the Doctor of Philosophy degree on him in 1957. In 1944 he was married to Margaret Sullivan and they are the parents of two sons. Starting at Miami University in 1946 as a graduate assistant Dr. Phelps progressed through the ranks to Professor of Speech and Director of Forensics in 1964. In 1967 he was appointed as the first Director of the Hamilton Campus of Miami University. He resigned from this post after nine years to return to full time teaching on the Oxford campus from which he took an early retirement in 1981. Dr. Phelps has been active in numerous civic organizations such as the Salvation Army, Hamilton Public Health Nursing Association, Catholic Social Services, Stewart School Parent Teachers Association, Kiwanis Club, United Way, and the Oxford City Council. He served as Mayor of Oxford 1965-1968 and as Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital 1981-. He was chosen Oxford Citizen of the Year in 1980 and Miami University awarded him its Bishop Medal in 1982. Professional activities include memberships in Phi Kappa Phi, the Central States Speech Association, Academy of Academic Personnel Administration, Speech Communication of Ohio (which selected him as Teacher of the Year in 1982). Speech Communication Association, the Hamilton Round Table Club, and the Miami Men's Club. He has authored articles and reviews in professional journals and has been involved in several recordings having to do with parliamentary procedure. Although his name may not be known to the thousands who attend football games in Oxford each fall, all have enjoyed his Saturday afternoon play by play announcements. He has served as the voice of the Redskins for over twenty years.

    Phillips Hall

    Margaret Evertson Phillips 1897-1973

    On June 14, 1974 the Board of Trustees voted to change the name of the women's physical education building from Herron Hall to Phillips Hall. Twelve years earlier, when the building was constructed, it had seemed logical that the name attached to the predecessor facility should be transferred to the new headquarters for women's physical education activities. At that time Miss Phillips was the chairman of the department and, except for naming a lounge in her honor in which an oil portrait was hung, no other tangible recognition was given to the dominant part she had played in developing the department and in designing the building. Margaret Evertson Phillips was born March 14, 1897 in New York City, the daughter of John Sanburn Phillips, a noted editor and co-founder of McClure's Magazine, and Jennie B. Peterson Phillips. She attended high school in Goshen, New York, where the family had moved, and was graduated from Vassar College with an A. B. degree in 1919. For the next two years she attended Wellesley College receiving a Certificate of Hygiene and Physical Education in 1921. Subsequently she attended the University of Wisconsin, New York University, Sarah Lawrence College, and Columbia University. The latter institution awarded her an A. M. degree in 1934. Miss Phillips joined the faculty of Miami University in September of 1921 as an Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Director of Physical Education for Women. She was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 1929 and was made a full professor in 1946. In 1961 she reliquished the chairmanship and in 1963 retired from the faculty of the University. She was a former president of the Women's Physical Education Section of the Ohio College Association and had been made an honorary member of that group. The Ohio Association of Health, Physical Education and Recreation had presented her its Certificate of Merit in both 1952 and 1958 as well as an honorary life membership. She was a member of the American Association of Health, Physical Education, the Midwest Association of Physical Education for College Women (honorary life membership 1960), Kappa Delta Pi, national honor society in education, and Delta Psi Kappa, national honor society in physical education for women. In 1964 the Margaret Phillips-WRA Scholarship Fund was established in her honor by alumni, staff, and students. In 1930 Miss Phillips established a program for women physical education majors and products of this curriculum are now teaching in schools and colleges throughout the country. They, along with her many friends and former colleagues, were saddened by her death in Oxford on December 12, 1973. All remember her dignity and poise admirably softened by the warmth of her personality. Her consistent maintenance of the highest standards of personal and professional ideals gave stature to her department and prestige to Miami University.

    Porter Hall

    Elizabeth C. Porter 1832-1897

    In 1955 when a new residence hall for women was in the planning stage the Board of Trustees voted to name it in honor of Elizabeth C. Porter (Mrs. David Swing). The building was completed in 1957 and dedicated on April 27 of that year. It and Swing Hall are named for a wife and husband as are Scott and Harrison Halls. Elizabeth C. Porter was born in Oxford, Ohio on March 5, 1832. Her father was a doctor and her grandfather, Rev. Alexander Porter, was a pioneer minister who came to Ohio from South Carolina in 1814 and served on the Board of Trustees of Miami 1819-21 and 1822-34. Elizabeth attended the Oxford Female College and received her degree in 1851. During the years 1848 to 1852 David Swing attended Miami University and his good friend Benjamin Harrison charged that he spent all of his spare hours at the home of Dr. Porter - where lived a lovely girl named Lizzie. After graduation Swing spent a year studying theology in Cincinnati but may well have been influenced to return to Miami to join the faculty in 1853 so that he could continue his courting. In any event, Elizabeth became Mrs. David Swing on July 14, 1854 and the newlyweds occupied quarters in one of the college buildings. In 1866 the Swing family, that now included two daughters, Mary and Helen, moved to Chicago. It was said of Mrs. Swing that she was "a woman domestic in her tastes, sweetly pious, and almost excessively modest. She was skilled in all of the arts of the home, a devoted wife and mother, gently-hearted and full of kindly hospitality." Elizabeh Porter Swing died in Chicago of tuberculosis on August 2, 1879 when she was only 48 years old. Her funeral was held in Oxford at the home of her son-in-law Mr. J. D. Ricker (Mary's husband). In attendance were notable persons from Chicago and Cincinnati as well as Helen, who subsequently became Mrs. Starring, her father, and her husband.

    Presser Hall

    Theodore Presser 1848-1925

    In 1928 the Theodore Presser Foundation agreed to bear half the expense of constructing a music hall for Western College. This generous offer was accepted and the building, completed in 1931, was the first to be erected on the western side of the campus facing Patterson Avenue. The building was appropriately named Presser Hall in honor of the man who established and funded the Theodore Presser Foundation. His biography as it appears in Vol. I of Who Was Who in America, 1897-1942, reads as follows: Presser, Theodore, music pub.; b. Pittsburgh, Pa., July 3, 1848; s. Christian and Caroline (Diet) P.; student Mt. Union (O) Coll.; studied music, N. E. Conservatory, 1878-80; m. Helen Louise Curran, 1890 (died 1905); m. 2d, Elise Houston, 1908. Entered retail music business, Pittsburgh, Pa., 1864; teacher of piano, Ohio Northern U., Ada, O., 1869-71, Smith Coll. and Conservatory, Xenia, O., 1872-75, Ohio Wesleyan U., 1876-78; prof. music, Hollins (Va.) Coll. 1880-83; founded The Etude, monthly music journalat Lynchburg, Va., 1883; removed to Phila., 1884 and continued as editor The Etude until 1891; head of Theodore Presser Co., music pubs. Erected and endowed, 1914, the Presser Home for Retired Music Teachers; founded, 1916, Presser Foundation. Author: School for Pianoforte Playing; School for Four Hand Playing; Polophony Playing. Presbyn. Home: Philadelphia, Pa. Died Oct. 28, 1925.

    Reid Hall

    Whitelaw Reid 1837-1912

    Built in 1948 as a men's residence, Reid Hall was named for a member of the Class of 1856. Whitelaw Reid became a distinguished journalist and diplomat but remained a loyal alumnus and is credited with obtaining a $40,000 gift from Andrew Carnegie when funds were being solicited for what was then known as the ALumni Library. The biography of Whitelaw Reid, as it appears in Who Was Who in America, Vol. I, 1897-1942, is lengthy in keeping with his many accomplishments. Reid, Whitelaw, diplomat, journalist; b. Xenia, O., Oct. 27, 1837; s. Robert Charlton and Marian (Ronalds) R.; A. B. Miami U., Oxford, O., 1856, A. M., 1859; hon. A. M., U. City of New York, 1872, Dartmouth, 1873; LL. D., Miami, 1890, Princeton, 1899, Yale, 1901, Cambridge, 1902, St. Andrews, 1905, Manchester, 1909; D. C. L., Oxford, 1907; m. Elizabeth, d. D. O. Mills, Apr. 26, 1881. Edited Xenia (O) News, 1858-59; legislative corr., 1860-61, war. corr., 1861-62, Washington corr., 1862-68, Cincinnati Gazette. A.-d.-c, staff of Gens. Thomas A. Morris and W. S. Rosecrans in W. Va.; clerk, mil. com., 37th Congress, 1862-63; librarian Ho. of Rep., 1863-66; cotton planter, Concordia Parish, La., 1866-67. Editorial staff New York Tribune, 1868, mng. editor, 1869, editor-in-chief and chief propr. 1872-1905; began tall building movement in New York by erection new Tribune Bldg., 1873; introduced linotype and organized Linotype Co. Declined appmts. as U. S. minister to Germany, 1877 and 1881; elected to bd. of regents, 1878, vice-chancellor, 1902, and chancellor, 1904, U. State of N. Y.; U. S. minister to France, 1889-92; Rep. nominee for Vice President U. S., 1892; spl. ambassador of the U. S. to Queen Victoria's jubilee, 1897; mem. Peace Commn. to Paris, 1898; spl. ambassador for Cornation of Edward VII, 1902; U. S. ambassador to England, 1905--. Author: After the War, a Southern Tour, 1867; Ohio in the War, 1868; Schools of Journalism, 1870; Newspaper Tendencies, 1874; Town Hall Suggestions, 1881; introduction to English edit. Talleyrand's Memoirs, 1891; Two Speeches at the Queen's Jubilee, 1897; Some Consequences of the Last Treaty of Paris, 1899; Our New Duties, 1899; Later Aspects of Our New Duties, 1899; A Continental Union, 1900; Our New Interests, 1900; Problems of Expansion, 1900; Carnegie Inst. Address, 1902; Monroe Doctrine, 1903; Greatest Fact in Modern History, 1906; How America Faced Its Educational Problem, 1906; introduction Centenary edit. Thackeray's Vanity Fair, London, 1908. Home: Purchase, N.Y. Died Dec. 15, 1912. The above biography fails to mention that Whitelaw Reid was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon when at Miami. It is also interesting that in the year Whitelaw Reid was nominated for Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket, his running mate was Benjamin Harrison. Although they lost the election it is probably the only time in history when both candidates held bachelor's degrees from the same institution.

    Rentschler Library

    Peter E. Rentschler 1897-1976

    The Hamilton Campus was dedicated on September 26, 1969. At that time two buildings had been completed - Mosler Hall and the Rentschler Library. The Board of Trustees in December, 1967 had approved the name Rentschler Library honoring the Hamilton family whose leadership helped make this branch campus possible. The person most responsible was Peter E. Rentschler who had served as chairman of the fund raising drive. Faced with a goal of $250,000 the campaign he directed brought in $1,600,000. Born in Hamilton, September 14, 1897, Peter E. Rentschler attended its public schools before entering Princeton University. Following graduation in 1920 he joined the Hamilton Foundry and the Decatur Casting Company (now divisions of the Hamilton Allied Corporation) and was serving as Chairman of the Board of Directors at the time of his death. His leadership in the iron foundry industry was recognized when he received the Gold Medal Award from the Gray & Ductile Iron Founders' Society and from the American Foundrymen's Society. When bestowed he was the only living iron foundryman to have received both honors. His interest and participation in educational, civic, and charitable activities was extensive. He was president of the Hamilton Board of Education for four years of the eight he served on this body. He was a Founding Trustee and Past Chairman of the Foundry Educational Foundation, a trustee of the Ohio Foundation of Independent Colleges, a board member of the Ohio Mechanics Institute, and the Ohio College of Applied Science. In addition to being a member of the Stephen T. Badin High School Foundation he served on numerous state and national educational commissions. In 1961 the University of Cincinnati established the Peter E. Rentschler Chair of Metallurgical Engineering, and in 1965 awarded him the honorary degree Doctor of Commercial Science. In 1970 Miami University honored him with a Doctor of Laws degree. A founding trustee of Hospital Care Corporation of Southwest Ohio and the first president of the Hamilton Safety Council, he was also a leader in such organizations as the Hamilton Association of Trade and Industry, Mercy Hospital, United Appeals, and the Navy League. He had served in the United States Navy in World War I. In the business world he was chairman of the Board of Directors of the Citizens Bank for fifteen years and was a board member of the Union Central Life Insurance Company of Cincinnati. Mr. Rentschler died January 25, 1976. His wife, to whom he was married on January 18, 1923, died July 25, 1976. Other Rentschler family members who provided support to the fund drive for the Hamilton campus were a brother, Walter A. Rentschler, then serving as president of the Citizens Bank, and an aunt, Helen Rentschler Waldon.

    Richard Hall

    Frances Gibson Richard 1866-1952

    In 1940 a unit of a women's residence hall was constructed and became known as South Hall. In 1952 a wing was added and, at a meeting of the Board of Trustees in June, the completed building was named Richard Hall honoring a former faculty member of the School of Education who had died the previous April. Frances Gibson Richard was born in Falling Springs, Pennsylvania on March 29, 1866. She attended the National Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio and this institution awarded her a Bachelor of Science degree in 1889 and a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1891. During the school year 1891-1892 she was employed by the Franklin Female College, Franklin, Kentucky, and studied privately with the guidance of its president, Dr. Herbert E. English. In 1893 she received a Master of Arts degree from the Bloomfield Academy of Franklin College. From 1892 to 1902 she was on the faculty of her Alma Mater, the National Normal University. In 1902 Mrs. Richard accepted a position at Miami University as an Instructor in English. She was a member of the first faculty of the Ohio State Normal College, which subsequently became the School of Education. In 1907 Mrs. Richard was promoted to the rank of Assistant Professor and from 1910 to her retirement in 1936 she held the rank of Associate Professor. She was the author of a monograph English for the Grades, which was published in the March, 1909, Miami Teacher's Bulletin. In 1928 Mrs. Richard wrote the libretto for a three act operetta titled The Emperor's Clothes. The music for this operetta was composed by Joseph Waddell Clokey '12, who was to become Dean of the School of Fine Arts. Frances Gibson Richard died in Erie, Pennsylvania on April 1, 1952. The building named in her honor was dedicated on December 6, 1952. The program for that event included the following statement: "Frances Gibson Richard came to the University in 1902 as a member of the first faculty of the Normal College, now the School of Education, whose fifty years of teacher training is being commemorated today. For thirty-four years Mrs. Richard was an enthusiastic, sympatheti, inspiring teacher of English at Miami, and for her students there could have been no finer experience as she was always the seeker after truth in prose and poetry and life, always a participant in the struggle for justice in the world about her."

    Robertson Laboratory

    Reuben B. Robertson, Jr. 1908-1960

    From 1916 to 1933 a brick structure directly east of what is now Kreger Hall was used as a combination storeroom, maintenance, and food service building. Between 1933 and 1959 one by one these functions were quartered elsewhere and the building was converted into research and classroom facilities for pulp and paper study. It was fitting to name the building for a recently deceased member of the Board of Trustees who, as president of nearby Champion Paper and Fibre Company, had been a leader in establishing a paper technology curriculum at Miami. Who Was Who in America, Vol. IV, 1961-1968 provides the following biographical data on Mr. Robertson: Robertson, Reuben B., Jr., corp. exec.; b. Asheville, N. C., June 27, 1908; s. Reuben B. and Hope (Thomson) R.; Chem. E., Sheffield Scientific Sch., Yale, 1930; married Margaret Watkins, Dec. 17, 1938; children-- Reuben B., III, Daniel Huger, Peter T., Margaret, Louise Hope, George. With Champion Paper & Fibre Co., 1934---, successively asst. mgr. Canton div., prodn. mgr., V. P., 1938, gen. prodn. manager all divisions, 1940, executive vice president, 1946-50, president, director 1950---; deputy sec. of defense, 1955-57; director B. F. Goodrich & Company, Cin. & Suburban Telephone Co., Dairy-pak, Inc., Procter & Gamble Co. Vice chmn. com. bus. orgn. Dept. Def., 1955. Trustee Miami U., 1957--, Duke 1957--, Asheville Sch. Boys, 1952--, Am. Assembly Columbia U., 1957--. Served from capt. to lt. col., AUS, 1942-45. Recipient award as man of yr. in paper industry for service to country Paper and Twine Ass., 1957., Employers Labor Relations Information Com. (pres. 1953-55, dir., v. p. 1957--), Am. Pulp and Paper Assn. (exec. com., v. p. 1958--), Nat. Indls. Conf. Bd., Indls. Relations Counselors (trustee 1957--), Cin. Council World Affairs (bd. mem. 1958--). Episcopalian. Mason. Clubs: Queen City, Commonwealth, Commercial (Cin); Links (N. Y. C.). Home: 9974 McKelvey Road, Cin. 31. Office: 601 N. B. St., Hamilton, O. Died March 13, 1960.

    Roudebush Hall

    Wallace Pattison Roudebush 1890-1956

    Completed in 1956, shortly after the death of W. P. Roudebush, a building designed to house administrative offices and records was originally dedicated as the Administration Building. At the service held on June 9, 1956 the address of President Millett was an official tribute to Mr. Roudebush. In his remarks Dr. Millett cited W. P. Roudebush as "a good and faithful servant, one who had for forty-five years given his time, energies, and abilities with single-minded devotion to the welfare of this institution." He also stated that a bronze plaque honoring Mr. Roudebush would be placed in the foyer as a memorial. Nine years later the Administration Building was named Roudebush. Wallace Pattison Roudebush was born in Owensville, Ohio, April 15, 1890. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Miami in 1911 after an active four years as an undergraduate. He was a member of Sigma Chi fraternity, won the Bishop Latin Prize as a sophomore, and served as business manager of The Miami Student, president of the Athletic Board of Control, senior senator in the Student Forum, and president of the Class of 1911. Following graduation President R. M. Hughes hired him as secretary to the president. for the next 45 years Mr. Roudebush continued his close association with the administration of the University under various titles. He was an assistant professor of accounting and insurance from 1913-19; professor, 1922-56. From 1911-17 he was secretary to the president; financial secretary, 1915-17; secretary to the Board of Trustees, 1917-50; vice president (finance) 1945-53; vice president, 1953-54; vice president and treasurer 1954-56. During his years on the staff Miami grew from an institution of 500 students and 10 buildings, which included four student residences, to an institution of 5,000 students and 60 buildings including 28 student residences. He helped to establish the Inter-University Council, and in the field of athletics the Buckeye Conference and later the Mid-American Conference. He was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Business Administration by Bowling Green State University in 1946, and was initiated as an honorary member of Beta Gamma Sigma in 1956. At the time of his death he was survived by his widow Mrs. Dorothy Roudebush, a son Warren of Washington, D. C., and a daughter Jane (Mrs. Raymond D. Bourne) of Oxford, and seven grandchildren. A son, Wallace P. Roudebush, Jr. died in 1935. Following his death a portrait was hung in the main lounge of the University Center, and the Wallace P. Roudebush Development Fund was established in the Miami University Foundation.

    Rowan Hall

    Stephen Clegg Rowan 1808-1890

    On October 28, 1949 the Miami Naval Science Armory was dedicated as Stephen Clegg Rowan Hall. The building was named for the first Miami student to enter the United States Naval Academy. Stephen Rowan entered Miami in 1825 from Piqua, Ohio and on February 15, 1826 he received an appointment as a midshipman so transferred after his freshman year. His biography, as it appears in Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896, is noticeably lacking in making any reference to Miami University or to the Naval Academy. It reads as follows: Rowan, Stephen Clegg, naval officer; b. nr. Dublin, Ireland, Dec. 25, 1908; s. John Rowan; m. Mary Stark, at least 1 child, Maj. Hamilton Rowan. Came to U. S., 1818; promoted to lt., 1837; served in ship Deleware in Brazil and Mediterranean stations, 1841-44; became exec. officer whip Cyane, Pacific Station, 1845; helped retake Los Angeles during Mexican War; served 2 tours of duty as ordnance insp. N. Y. Navy Yard; commd. comdr., 1855; in command steam sloop Pawnee which supplied chief defense of Washington (D. C.) during Lincoln's inauguration, 1861; directed 1st shot fired from naval vessel in Civil War against batteries at Aquia Creek, 1861; cooperated with Gen. Burnside in capture of Roanoke Island and destruction of Confederate gunboat, 1862; attacked Cable's Point on Pasquotank River, destroyed fort and captured or routed Confederate squadron, 1862; assisted army to capture New Bern, 1862; promoted capt. and commodore, 1862; commanded New Ironsides in Charleston Harbor, 1863; detached to command all naval forces in N. C. Sound, 1864; promoted rear adm., 1866; in command Norfolk (Va.) Navy Yard, 1866-67, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-70, N. Y. Yard, 1872-76; gov. Naval Asylum, Phila., 1881; supt. Naval Observatory, 1882; commd. vice adm., 1870; retired, 1889. Died Washington, D. C., Mar. 31, 1890; buried Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington. In 1969, following the completion of Millett Hall, the activities of the Naval ROTC unit at Miami were transferred to that building and Rowan Ha;; became an art museum.

    Sawyer Gymnasium

    Mary Alma Sawyer 1854-

    Miss Helen Peabody's last appointment to the faculty of the Western Female Seminary was Miss Mary Alma Sawyer who was named Instructor in Chemistry and Physics in 1887. In 1895 she was selected by the trustees to a newly created post of Dean and she carried this title until her retirement in 1920. On two occasions, 1906-1908 and 1912-1914, she served as Acting President. A gymnasium that included a swimming pool was started in 1912 and completed in 1914. It was appropriately named Sawyer Gymnasium in honor of Dean Sawyer who was Acting President during its construction. Her biography as it appears in Who Was Who in America, Vol. IV, 1961-1968, provides the following information: SAWYER, Mary Alma, college dean; b. at Reading, Vt., Nov. 26, 1854; d. Orren Spaulding and Sophronia (Wheelock) S.; grad. Mt. Holyoke, 1879, A. M., 1901; post-grad., Harvard; Litt.D., Miami U., 1907; unmarried. Teacher pub. schs., Vt. and Mass.; teacher of science, Demill Coll., Oshawa, Ont., 1882-87; teacher, 1887-1920, dean, 1896-1920, acting pres., 1906, 08, 12-14, The Western Coll. for Women. Home: 12 Taylor St., Mt. Holyoke, Mass.

  • Conditions Governing Access

    Materials do not circulate and are made available to users in the Miami University Archives.

  • Conditions Governing Use

    Materials do circulate and may only be used in the archives.

  • Preferred Citation

    Miami University Libraries. Miami University Archives, Oxford, Ohio

  • Physical Location

    Miami University Archives, King Library, 3rd Floor, Walter Havighurst Special Collections, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio

Instances

  • Type
    Books
    Container 1 Type
    Object
    Container 1 Indicator
    "Miami University Buildings: Past and Present," by Peter Flintermann; 1966; 1A-F-1A
  • Type
    Books
    Container 1 Type
    Object
    Container 1 Indicator
    Miami Album, by Walter Havighurst, John Watterson Howard, and Joyce Gordon; 1981
  • Type
    Books
    Container 1 Type
    Object
    Container 1 Indicator
    "Biographies of the Men and Women for Whom the Buildings of Miami University Have Been Named," by R. E. Glos; 1983
    Container 1 Barcode
    Call number: Archives/LD/3241/.M534/G56/1983x.
  • Type
    Books
    Container 1 Type
    Object
    Container 1 Indicator
    "A Study of Oxford House Signs Poiting to Students' Values," by Reginald D. Olson; 2000
  • Type
    Books
    Container 1 Type
    Object
    Container 1 Indicator
    "The Houses of Miami University," by K. Gustafson; 2010

Components